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In three days, learn about birds, bees and butterflies

Learn about birds

Cooperative Extension You might get to meet an owl at a Cooperative Extension day camp.

Cooperative Extension You might get to meet an owl at a Cooperative Extension day camp.

Summertime is a great time to learn about some of my favorite pollinators, birds, bees and butterflies.

Rowan County Cooperative Extension is hosting a day camp from 1-4 p.m. on July 13 through 15, for 5- to 8-year-olds to learn about our flying friends. One day we will focus on birds and their importance to our ecosystem.Educators from Wildlife Rehab Inc. will bring rescued owls and a hawk for the children to visit with.

Wildlife Rehab Inc. is a nonprofit organization that is a network of homebased wildlife rehabilitators. We will have bird-themed snacks and crafts to create, as well as an activity discovering just what birds really eat.

On our bee day, a Rowan County beekeeper will bring their demonstration hive and we will learn all about the dance of the bees. The kids will have a chance to get up close and personal with the bees without the danger of getting stung.

Did you know that in order to produce one pound of honey, 2 million flowers must be visited? A hive of bees must fly 55,000 miles to produce a pound of honey. One bee colony can produce 60 to 100 pounds of honey per year. An average worker bee makes only about one-twelfth teaspoon of honey in its lifetime. Bees are amazing creatures. Once again we will have honey and bee themed snacks and crafts.

The last day of camp is butterfly day. Our friends from All a Flutter Butterfly farm in High Point will be joining us. All a Flutter raises thousands of Monarch butterflies each year to sell to businesses and individuals for all kinds of special occasions. We will learn all about the exciting transformations in the life of a Monarch butterfly. Each day we will spend some time in our gardens at the Extension Center looking at the various habitats for bees, birds and butterflies.

It is a great way to expose young kids to nature and learn about our environment. Space is limited to 15 children. Must by age 5 as of Jan. 1, 2016. Registration is $15and forms must be turned in no later than July 8. Please call 704-216-8970 for more information.

Amy-Lynn Albertson is director of Rowan County Extension.

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