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Danelle Cutting: Don’t start planting yet

Extension agent

Cutting

Cutting

With the warm temperatures, many people have wanted to get outdoors and garden. It is definitely a good time to get routine chores out of the way, but I would be cautious doing certain gardening tasks.

In this article, I will talk about a few things gardeners can do, some classes that are coming up, and some things that a gardener should wait a little longer before starting.

This week has been filled with calls about pruning, sowing seeds and starting to plant. I can definitely associate with those callers because this warm weather makes just about everyone want to get outside and do something. But, let me remind you that you are still in March and as the old saying states, “In like a lion, out like a lamb.” It can also be switched around. So, I caution the gardeners who are ready to put out their tomatoes, corn and squash.

Our last frost date is usually around April 15 (plus or minus a few days). This is when we usually start planting our warm season crops. We do this so we don’t have to worry about the frost killing our plants.

Now, if you want to grow some cool season crops like broccoli, cabbage, lettuces, kale, etc., you can start planting them. If you are using transplants, make sure that you did not grow them yourself. You should harden them off for at least a week.

You can also have your soil sampled. Stop by our office, 2727-A Old Concord Rd., Salisbury, and pick up a soil test kit. Make sure all of your tools are sharpened and cleaned. This is important to reduce issues of disease and increase the life of your tools. Soil and debris will erode your metal and can shorten the life of your tools substantially.

If you are like me and ready to garden, maybe you would be interested in some of our gardening classes that are about to start. If you would like more information on growing your own vegetables, sign up for my Gardening 101 classes being held at the Miller Center, 1402 Bank St., on Thursdays, beginning March 19 and ending April 2, from 6-7 p.m. This is a great opportunity to learn how to garden for free. If you would like to sign up, visit: www.salisburync.gov/PLAY or call 704-216-PLAY.

If you would like more personal information about growing your own vegetables, contact your local Cooperative Extension agent, Danelle Cutting, at 704-216-8970.

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