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Now is the perfect time to plant spring bulbs

SALISBURY — It’s predicted to be cool and possibly damp over the next few days — the perfect time of year to get outside and plant spring flowering bulbs.
Extension Master Gardener volunteers braved freezing temperatures last week, planting more than 500 spring flowering bulbs in the Sloop Garden at the Agriculture Center on Old Concord Road. Cool fall weather and recent rains make this an opportune time to plant spring flowering bulbs. Bulbs such as daffodils, tulips, hyacinths and crocus need to be planted soon.
Fall planting aids in good root development and satisfies the cool temperature requirements of bulbs. A good selection of bulbs is now available from local garden shops and retail outlets. Select bulbs that are firm and healthy. Small nicks and loose skins do not affect the growth and development of the bulb. In fact, loose skins aid in inspection for diseases and other deformities.
The size and number of blooms per bulb is directly related to the size of the bulb. Small economy bulbs, sold by the hundreds, are no bargain when bulbs produce small, less attractive blooms later in the spring. Large healthy bulbs produce large, showy blooms.
Well drained soils are essential for adequate bulb growth. Avoid planting in poorly drained soils. Tight clay soils should be amended with top soil, ground bark or composted material worked into the soil. Raised beds that include good topsoil and soil amendments are excellent areas to locate bulbs.
Soil pH is also an important factor in bulb growth and development. Bulbs grow best in soils with a pH between 6.5 and 7.0. A soil test may reveal the need for dolomitic lime to raise the pH of Rowan’s naturally acidic soils.
The planting procedure in the fall is important for later spring performance. Small sized bulbs (1 inch in height) should be planted 4 to 5 inches deep. Larger bulbs (2 inches or more in height) should be planted 7 to 8 inches deep, with the depths measured from the base of the bulb to the soil line. Try to loosen the soil under the bulb before planting. Large bulbs should be planted 3 to 6 inches apart and small bulbs 1 to 2 inches apart. Small and large bulb varieties can be inter-planted.
Bone meal is an organic fertilizer that is often used to promote bulb establishment and growth; however, research has shown that the processing that goes into making bone meal removes much of the nutrients. Other experts lament that the natural fertilizer actually attracts animals such as raccoons, voles and other rodents. Specialized bulb food or fertilizers are now available, designed to maximize top growth and bulb development.
Cover the bulbs with half the soil backfill, water thoroughly and finish covering with remaining soil. Cover the planted bulbs with 2 to 3 inches of mulch to conserve water and reduce winter weed growth. Be sure to irrigate as needed during winter droughts.
Mark your bulbs to determine which did well and those that didn’t meet your expectations. You’ll want to try new ones each year when you get the fever.
Darrell Blackwelder is the county Extension director with horticulture responsibilities with the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service in Rowan County. Contact him at 704-216-8970 or www.rowanextension.com

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