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Azaleas one of most popular plants in Rowan

SALISBURY — With all the new shrub cultivars developed each year, azaleas still remain one of the most popular plant materials in Rowan County landscapes. Nurseries, garden centers and other retail outlets consistently sell out of these plants each spring.
Newly developed Encore azaleas have become a very popular addition to urban landscapes. A relatively new addition to landscapes, Encore azaleas bloom in the spring and again into the fall. Some nurseries boast nine months of bloom, but in our area, most bloom three times a year, resting between blooms. These plants are especially popular because they can tolerate full sun and seem to be more heat tolerant than the older spring blooming azaleas. Once established, the plants will bloom consistently at different intervals.
With all the rain and cool weather, most azaleas have done well but may have become leggy and misshapen with excessive growth. Now is the time to judiciously prune leggy azaleas after the blooms are spent. It’s also very important to avoid pruning late in the summer past July 4. Late summer is when azaleas typically set next season’s buds. Good bud set can be ensured with adequate moisture and careful fertilization during the growing season. Adequate moisture and proper fertilization prepares plants for cold weather and makes them less likely to be winter damaged. Regular grade fertilizers or those developed especially for azaleas can be applied now until August. Avoid fertilization after August. Tender growth promoted by late summer and early fall fertilization often occurs during unseasonably cold weather.
For showy blooms, azaleas need to be free from insects. Lace bugs will literally suck the life blood from the plant. Lace bugs are a serious pest of azaleas. Lace bugs are small, clear-winged insects that feed on the underside of azalea leaves. There are usually two generations of adults during the summer season; one generation now and another generation emerges in August. Their presence is noted by yellow splotches on the upper side of the leaf. The leaves of a heavily infested azalea will appear totally bleached. Lace bugs deposit varnish-like black excrement (fly specks) on the lower surface of the leaves.
There are a couple of different options for controlling this pest. The easiest method is to treat with a systemic insecticide which can be applied as a soil drench. The chemical is mixed with water and applied to the soil around the plants. The material with be translocated through the plant’s roots and move throughout the plant. This method is best as a preventative measure and will usually offer protection for a full year. Treatment should be done now if you have had problems with azalea lace bug in the past.
Those who prefer a more conventional spray application must spray when the insects are active (mid-April, and again in August). Use horticultural oil, or an insecticide containing pyrethroids for these sprays. You will most likely need to treat two times 10 days apart to fully control azalea lace bug. Because the insect lives on the underneath side of the leaf, it is very important for the spray to reach underneath the leaves when spraying.

Darrell Blackwelder is Extension Director Rowan County Center, N.C. Cooperative Extension. 704-216-8970

www.rowanmastergardener.com

rowan.ces.ncsu.edu
www.rowanextension.com

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