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‘It’s our big time’: Salisbury Farmers Market reopens Saturday

SALISBURY — The Railwalk Pavilion will once again be filled with fresh produce, fragrant flowers and sweet-smelling baked goods on Saturday when the Salisbury Farmers Market reopens for the spring season.

“We’re excited and ready to go,” said Mike Miller, chair of the Salisbury Farmers Market Board of Directors and the owner of Miller Farms. “It’s our big time. All of our growers have a lot invested in our crops right now.”

Farmers will be offering lettuce, beets, collards, spring onions, strawberries and other vegetables in addition to eggs and meat. Baked goods, honey, flowers and crafts will be available as well. As customers peruse the tables, live music will be played by C.J. Peters and Shelby Stover.

This will be the Salisbury Farmers Market’s second year at its new home under the pavilion at 223 E. Kerr St. The market debuted there last May after the COVID-19 pandemic forced it to delay opening for several weeks.

“Last year was a real challenge with the COVID issues and everything, but we’re still asking folks to wear masks at the market and try to continue to social distance while they’re there as best as possible,” said David Correll, a board member and the owner of Correll Farms. “We are an outdoor, open-air venue. So, we hope people will come out and shop. It’ll be great to see everybody again.”

The Salisbury Farmers Market moved to the pavilion from its former location near Sidekick Karate on South Main Street. The pavilion boasts many natural advantages, both for shoppers who find easy parking in the Lee Street lot and vendors who now have access to power and a roof over their heads.

“Feedback has been extremely positive with the location,” Correll said. “There’s plenty of parking with Lee Street and by the railwalk. Customers have embraced being able to park close to the market. Vendors have been happy with having the amenities of power and a covered facility that help us become a rain-or-shine market.”

The pavilion is loaned to the market for use by the Rowan County Tourism Development Authority. Mike Miller said he envisions the space being the market’s permanent home.

With a long-term location and a growing list of vendors, Correll anticipates the farmers market becoming a staple of Saturday mornings for locals.

“I think as we’re able to move forward with this season and as the pandemic slows or comes to an end, we’ll be able to have some special events and activities for kids,” Correll said. “We’ll be able to continue to grow as safety allows with having it more as a destination for folks to come on Saturday mornings and spend a little more time there.”

Alongside established vendors like Two Pigs Farm and Lee’s Flowers, there will be a few new faces at the farmers market this season, including Liberty Farm and Creamery. The Cleveland-based operation will offer goat cheese made from its very own dairy goats, something that’s been missing from the market.

“We do target a few vendors, specifically like the goat cheese, that’s something we’ve been missing at the market,” Correll said. “We’ve made contact with vendors or farmers producing that and encourage them to apply.”

The market will have about 20 vendors at peak season, but its organizers aren’t opposed to adding even more.

“We’re always open to new vendors,” Correll said. “We intend for our market to continue to grow.”

Prospective vendors can apply for their spot at the market online at www.visitsalisburync.com or by speaking with Market Manager Lindsay Stallings at the market on Saturdays.

The Salisbury Farmers Market will be open from 8 a.m.-noon. Correll encourages people to get there early.

“The best selection is always early,” Correll said.

More info about the Salisbury Farmers Market can be found online at www.visitsalisburync.com. Announcements and updated vendor lists are posted on the organization’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/SalisburyFarmersMarket.

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