Ask Us: Readers ask about lake structure, turn light, RCCC entrance

Published 2:00 am Monday, March 29, 2021

Editor’s note: Ask Us is a weekly feature published online Mondays and in print on Tuesdays. We’ll seek to answer your questions about items or trends in Rowan County. Have a question? Email it to askus@salisburypost.com.

SALISBURY – A photo of a drained City Park Lake published on Tuesday sparked a reader question about a star-shaped structure on the bed.

The photo shows some ducks milling around near the structure while Salisbury-Rowan Utilities workers were on site to fix a leaking abandoned pipe. The leak drained the lake almost completely.

City stormwater technician Michael Hanna told the Post the image shows one of four fish habitats at the bottom of the lake. These are intersecting PVC pipes anchored to the lake bed with concrete.

They attract organic matter for fish to feed on and a place for them to shelter.

In addition to the PVC “porcupine balls,” the lake has concrete pipes for fish to enjoy.

Will there ever be a dedicated left turn light on Mooresville Road turning onto Main Street?

City Engineer Wendy Brindle said there is a permissive left turn lane (a flashing yellow arrow) at the intersection but no protected left movement from a light. the N.C. Department of Transportation currently has no plans to upgrade the intersection, but Brindle said the city is completing a study on whether an upgrade is appropriate to submit to the department.

Will the Old Concord Road entrance at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College reopen?

The college barricaded the entrance to funnel campus visitors through its required drive-thru health screenings for visitors.

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Director of Events and Logistics Dusty Saine said one side of the entrance has been left open for emergency vehicles to reach training grounds on site.

Saine said the entrance will reopen when the college stops health screenings. The college is reviewing the screenings and expects a decision in the next month.

The college has been following standard COVID-19 precautions for the past year with entrance screenings, mask requirements and social distancing. Most of the college’s classes have been online only for the past year with a notable exception for emergency services courses.