Letter: United Way enables Capstone’s services

Published 12:00 am Thursday, September 3, 2020

Over the past four years, I have had the privilege to serve as a volunteer at Capstone Recovery Center. I have learned that recovery from addictive behaviors is an intense job. It takes hard work, dedication and a transformation of self. I witness each lady entering Capstone broken, distraught, scared and hopeless. By graduation, I see a totally transformed person that is clean, sober, happy, hopeful, filled with the Holy Spirit and ready to make responsible decisions. They have even secured employment, housing and determined plans for their future. For me, it is such a blessing to experience the positive changes that occur in these wonderful women.

Capstone provides a safe, Godly refuge where ladies can focus on their recovery without the stresses of the outside world. They engage in multiple Bible studies, life-skills classes and intensive counseling with Bible-based solutions to their individual needs and circumstances. During their residency, they are responsible for daily chores and general upkeep of the house. They are also given many opportunities to give back to the community that so graciously provides for them.

With the community impact grant award from Rowan County United Way, foundations, churches, personal and corporate donations, Capstone can provide a free, nine-month residential stay for the ladies. Because Rowan County United Way has identified substance abuse and mental health in its needs assessment for this county, it is investing in the lives of the residents of Capstone.

It not only provides much-needed funding, but it also sends volunteers for Day of Caring projects and opens doors for the ladies to volunteer in the community. Thank you, Rowan County United Way! With the help of your giving, the ladies at Capstone are recovering from their addictive behaviors and are being equipped to make responsible choices that will lead them to establish themselves as positive, productive and fully functional members of the community.

— Wanda Kluttz

Salisbury

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