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Letter: Political correctness is a virus

Recently, China marked the 31st anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, where over 7,000 peaceful, pro-democracy protesters were slaughtered. Why any country in the world from that point on would do business with China is beyond me.

Today in America, we have federal agents being labeled as storm troopers for using tear gas and the occasional rubber bullets against protests that become violent and dangerous. 

At the end of last year, China unleashed a virus upon the rest of the world. No one disputes the origin of this virus. No one disputes that China withheld info about the severity and contagion of the virus. This is information the rest of the world needed to have. 

Yet, it seems what upsets some people the most is that President Trump refers to this pandemic as the China virus. Apparently, he’s being insensitive, which is causing division between our fellow Asian-American  citizens and the rest of us. Anybody who believes this and doesn’t assign blame to the communist China government needs to have their head examined.

This is just another example of political correctness run amok. Political correctness is a virus in itself. It’s spreading across America, causing statues to be toppled, businesses rebranding their logos, sports teams changing or considering changing their names and our leaders being silent or acquiescent. I’ve never witnessed such cowardice and pandering in my life. Heaven forbid someone calls you a racist. If you’re called one but know you’re not, say so! Show some backbone. 

The world will get its arms around the “China virus,” whether it’s with a vaccine or medicine that keeps the virus in check so we can go on with our everyday lives. Now, if we could only manufacture a courage pill.

— Allan Gilmour

Salisbury

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