• 73°

Poll finds nearly half of Americans say lost jobs won’t return

By Josh Boak and Emily Swanson

Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly half of Americans whose families experienced a layoff during the coronavirus pandemic now believe those jobs are lost forever, a new poll shows, a sign of increasing pessimism that would translate into roughly 10 million workers needing to find a new employer, if not a new occupation.

It’s a sharp change after initial optimism the jobs would return, as temporary cutbacks give way to shuttered businesses, bankruptcies and lasting payroll cuts. In April, 78% of those in households with a job loss thought they’d be temporary. Now, 47% think that lost job is definitely or probably not coming back, according to the latest poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

The poll is the latest sign the solid hiring of May and June, as some states lifted stay-at-home orders and the economy began to recover, may wane as the year goes on. Adding to the challenge: Many students will begin the school year online, making it harder for parents to take jobs outside their homes.

“Honestly, at this point, there’s not going to be a job to go back to,” said Tonica Daley, 35, who lives in Riverside, California, and has four children ranging from 3 to 18 years old. “The kids are going to do virtual school, and there is no day care.”

Daley was furloughed from her job as a manager at J.C. Penney, which has filed for bankruptcy protection. The extra $600 a week in jobless benefits Congress provided as part of the federal government’s coronavirus relief efforts let her family pay down its credit cards, she said, but the potential expiration or reduction of those benefits in August would force her to borrow money to get by.

The economy’s recovery has shown signs of stalling amid a resurgence of the coronavirus. The number of laid-off workers seeking jobless benefits rose last week for the first time since March, while the number of U.S. infections shot past 4 million — with many more cases undetected.

The poll shows that 72% of Americans would rather have restrictions in place in their communities to stop the spread of COVID-19 than remove them in an effort to help the economy. Just 27% want to prioritize the economy over efforts to stop the outbreak.

“The only real end to this pandemic problem is the successful application of vaccines,” said Fred Folkman, 82, a business professor from Long Island, in New York.

About 9 in 10 Democrats prioritize stopping the virus, while Republicans are more evenly divided — 46% focus on stopping the spread, while 53% say the economy is the bigger priority.

President Donald Trump and Congress have yet to agree to a new aid package. Democrats, who control the House, have championed an additional $3 trillion in help, including money for state and local governments. Republicans, who control the Senate, have proposed $1 trillion, decreasing the size of the expanded unemployment benefits.

Comments

Education

Back to School: Calendars

Education

Back to School: Getting to know local schools

Education

Back to School: A message from RSS Superintendent Lynn Moody

Education

Q&A with Summit Academy Principal Amy Pruitt

Education

Lessons for the fall from a spring of remote preschool

Back to school

Back to School: Basic supplies needed

Back to school

Back to School: School bus safety

Education

Back to School: New COVID-19 precautions will be in place across the district

Local

City lifts moratorium on utility disconnections; will continue to explore options for outstanding debt

East Spencer

‘This is our lifeline:’ East Spencer officials ask Salisbury for water billing credit to aid in economic development

Coronavirus

Autumn Care becomes newest site of COVID-19 outbreak

Education

Rowan-Salisbury Schools asking parents to find alternatives to school buses

Local

Salisbury license plate office sets record straight on long lines

Business

Utility cutoffs could begin this month in Landis

Crime

Man held in contempt of court for not wearing mask, disruption

Local

Business, assembly, mask mandates extended longer in NC

Education

Education briefs

Education

Education shoutouts

Crime

Police: Woman reports car stolen with keys in the ignition

Local

Former Editor Cook to lead special gifts for 2020 United Way campaign

Crime

Vandals spraypaint wall at Salisbury National Cemetery

Local

State responds to plea for transportation museum’s reopening

Education

NC wins federal grant to improve instruction during school disruptions

Coronavirus

Recoveries rise in addition to 29 new positives