• 50°

Dr. Chris Magryta: Cost

By Dr. Chris Magryta
Salisbury Pediatrics

In a recent Wall Street Journal article, Annie Gasparo looks at rising food prices amid the COVID experience. Food prices are rising faster than any time in the last 40 years. This poses serious problems for those already strapped by COVID-related economic problems. The good-quality nutritious foods are rising faster in price than the low-quality highly processed indirectly government subsidized foods. Again, we find the deck stacked against the consumption of high-quality, low-inflammation foods that shield us from disease.

Looking to previous discussions on this topic, one can reduce the expensive meat/fish component of the grocery bill and move towards dried legumes, whole grains and fresh/frozen vegetables and fruits to round out a quality meal plan on a budget. It can be done with planning, desire and effective choices.

From a Healthline article:
1) Plan your meals: planning reduces waste and increases yield based on purchased products
2) Make a grocery list and stick to it. It’s very easy to get sidetracked at the grocery store, which can lead to unintended, expensive purchases. Try to shop the perimeter of the store first. This will make you more likely to fill your cart with whole foods.
The middle of the store often contains the most processed and unhealthy foods. If you find yourself in these aisles, look to the top or bottom of the shelves rather than straight ahead. The most expensive items are usually placed at eye level. Additionally, there are now many great grocery list apps to help you shop. Some of them can even save favorite items or share lists between multiple shoppers. Using an app is also a great way to make sure you don’t forget your list at home.
3) Cook more often at home as it is much cheaper to get a healthy meal at home.
4) Cook larger portions and use leftovers as future meals.
5) Never shop when you are hungry. Impulse hunger buying increases tremendously.

Dr. Chris Magryta is a physician at Salisbury Pediatric Associates. Email him at newsletter@salisburypediatrics.com.

About Post Lifestyles

Visit us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SalPostLifestyle/ and Twitter @postlifestlyes for more content

email author More by Post

Comments

Nation/World

Senate Democrats strike deal on jobless aid, move relief bill closer to approval

News

Duke Life Flight pilot may have shut down wrong engine in fatal crash

News

Two NC counties get to participate in satellite internet pilot for students

Local

PETA protesters gather in front of police department

Coronavirus

Seven new COVID-19 deaths, 166 positives reported in county this week

Crime

Sheriff’s office: Two charged after suitcase of marijuana found in Jeep

Crime

Thomasville officer hospitalized after chase that started in Rowan County

Local

Board of elections discusses upgrading voting machines, making precinct changes

News

Lawmakers finalize how state will spend COVID-19 funds

Local

Salisbury Station one of several ‘hot spots’ included in NCDOT rail safety study

Education

Essie Mae Kiser Foxx appeal denied, school considering options

News

Iredell County votes to move Confederate memorial to cemetery

Nation/World

Lara Trump may have eyes on running for a Senate seat

Local

Rowan among counties in Biden’s disaster declaration from November floods

Local

PETA plans protest at Salisbury Police Department on Friday

Education

Essie Mae Kiser Foxx appeal denied, charter revoked

Coronavirus

29 new positives, no new COVID-19 deaths reported

Crime

Blotter: Woman charged with drug crimes

News

Nesting no more: Eagles appear to have moved on from Duke’s Buck Station

Business

The Smoke Pit leaving downtown Salisbury for standalone building on Faith Road

Education

Shoutouts

High School

High school football: Hornets’ Gaither set the tone against West

Local

Salisbury to show off new fire station

Education

Livingstone College to host virtual Big Read events this month