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Letter: Is quid pro quo even illegal for president?

For three years, Democrats have done nothing but try and prove that Russia and President Donald Trump worked together to rig the 2016 election in his favor. In this age of zero privacy and leaks galore, proving something like this shouldn’t be a problem. Alas, there has been no proof.

Forever in search of something, Democrats are now going after Trump for a possible quid pro quo with the leader of Ukraine. Apparently Trump is “shaking down” the Ukrainian leader in hopes of digging up dirt against presidential candidate Joe Biden, presumably to derail his campaign. This is a gross oversimplification.

Decent evidence has emerged suggesting that Ukraine, along with some Russian operatives, tried to influence the 2016 election. Trying to do such a thing is serious and it’s paramount to find out if this is true. This is the truth Trump is trying to uncover and so be it if Biden and his son Hunter got caught in the crossfire.

Ukraine is supposed to be our ally. Yet, for them to request billions of dollars in foreign aid while at the same time possibly trying to sabotage our 2016 presidential election is outrageous. As our president, Trump has various weapons at his disposal to get to the truth. Some call it a quid pro quo. I call it leverage. This is nothing new. The entire world revolves around being able to make deals to get what you want or need. It’s all one, big I’ll-give-you-this-if-you-give-me-that situation. I’m no constitutional lawyer, but I’m wondering if this quid pro quo stuff is even illegal, let alone impeachable.

The difference between the initial Russia and Trump investigation and the Ukraine one is that the second doesn’t have Trump as the potential fall guy. Democrats are protecting one or some of their own. Election rigging be damned. These frauds are putting themselves first and not America.

— Allan Gilmour

Salisbury

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