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DCCC awarded grant to help students finish their degrees

Davidson County Community College

Davidson County Community College has been awarded $35,000 in partnership with DavidsonWorks from the state’s Finish Line Grants program. The program is an initiative to help community college students across North Carolina complete training and education when facing unforeseen obstacles.

Students are able to apply for a set amount of money to help cover the costs of such life events. The goal is to ensure financial barriers are alleviated so students may complete their academic programs.

Allowable expenses under the program include transportation, car repairs, child care, dependent care, housing, utility bills, medical referrals, accommodations for people with disabilities, and assistance with books and supplies.

“These are real financial barriers our students face,” said Martika Nelson, DCCC’s single-stop coordinator. “Financial challenges will happen in our student population this year, and these funds will go to helping those students follow through with their education after all their hard work and effort they’ve put into their program.”

The college partnered with DavidsonWorks to apply for the grant. Representatives of each organization will collaborate to review funding requests from students who have completed 75 percent of their degree or credential, including courses in the current enrolled semester. Applicants must also be in good academic standing with a 2.0 GPA or higher.

Eligible students experiencing a financial emergency can request for funds from the Finish Line Grants through the Single Stop Office on the second floor of the Mendenhall Building of the Davidson campus. DCCC faculty may also refer students for funding.

Gov. Roy Cooper announced the program July 12, to be used in the 2018-19 school year. The program was created from the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Title I funds.

“These funds could make the difference between derailing a student’s education and the excitement of pride of walking across the graduation stage. We’re excited to have the opportunity to make the latter a reality for students facing these financial situations,” Nelson said.

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