• 72°

Spencer budget includes longevity pay change

By Rebecca Rider
rebecca.rider@salisburypost.com

SPENCER — Town of Spencer employees could receive a 2 percent salary increase beginning in the 2017-18 budget year.

The adjustment is included in the town’s proposed budget for the upcoming fiscal year, which rounds out at $3.1 million.

Also included is a change in longevity pay schedule for town employees. Should it be approved, employees with one to 10 years of employment with the town will receive an annual longevity payment of 2 percent of their base salary. Those with 10 to 20 years employment will receive 3 percent, and those with 20 or more years will receive 4 percent.

The Fire Department would use the current longevity pay schedule, as its scheduling would not support the proposed change.

Town Manager Reid Walters said that the town budget usually hovers around $2.6 million, but it’s higher this year due to storm water and street repairs along Fourth Street. Nearly $400,000 has been placed in capital outlay to cover the cost of the project — funded by the N.C. General Assembly and the N.C. Department of Transportation — which has caused a significant hike in the proposed 2017-18 budget.

The Spencer Police Department has requested the purchase of a new vehicle with an in-car camera. According to town documents, the vehicle would cost $33,000. The department also applied for a $25,000 grant to purchase new weapons. Walters said police have received tentative approval of the grant.

Walters also reported staffing changes with the Spencer Fire Department, which will switch to a combination of full- and part-time staffing for the weekends to handle increased call volume. The proposed budget also includes the cost and up-fit for a ladder truck, purchased from Salisbury, for $45,000.

The budget also includes appropriating a total $110,000 from the general fund to purchase a backhoe for $85,000 and a street sweeper for $25,000. According to town documents, Spencer’s current backhoe is 19 years old and in need of bucket repair.

The town has also proposed an “after the fact” fee. Should the increase be approved, residents who begin a project before getting required permits will have to pay an increased fee to do so. A zoning permit would cost $125, instead of the current $20, for example.

According to town documents, the intent is to encourage residents to get appropriate permits and permissions before beginning work.

Should it be approved, the “after the fact” fees will be as follows:

  • Zoning permit: $125
  • Zoning permit for fences: $50
  • Certificate of appropriateness: $250
  • Dumpster permit: $50

The addition of Powell Bill funds brings the total proposed budget to $3.2 million. A public hearing will be held Monday, June 26, at 6 p.m. in Town Hall, 600 S. Salisbury Ave.

Contact reporter Rebecca Rider at 704-797-4264. 

Comments

Local

‘Meet the need’: Rowan County Health Department looks to add to vaccination options

Local

Seaford is first woman in county hired for town manager position since the ’90s

Local

Colonial Spring Frolic makes a comeback to kick off museum’s year

Local

Concord City Council wants to name bridge for fallen officer, Rowan native

Education

RSS administration will recommend selling Faith Elementary property to charter school

Local

Rowan County Democrats re-elect leaders, pass resolutions

Business

Inspired by advice from father-in-law, Angela Mills launches her own business in memory of him

Local

Baseball: Memories come alive in Ferebee book

Local

During Child Abuse Prevention Month, professionals reflect on detecting abuse in a virtual world

Business

Biz Roundup: Small Business Center announces spring slate of workshop for business owners

Clubs

Kiwanis Pancake Festival starts Friday

Local

Rowan fire marshal seeks to clear up confusion, worry caused by solicitation letter

Education

Fun every day: Fifth anniversary for Yadkin Path Montessori School

Nation/World

Charles: Royal family ‘deeply grateful’ for support for Philip

News

North Carolina sites to resume J&J vaccines after CDC review

News

Cooper OKs bill offering K-12 students summer school option

High School

High school football: Playoff time means get ready for ‘big-boy football’

High School

High school football: Hornets overpower South to secure playoff spot

Crime

Jeffrey MacDonald won’t be released despite deteriorating health

Business

Amazon warehouse workers reject union in Alabama

Nation/World

Ex-NFL player’s brain to be probed for trauma-related harm after Rock Hill shootings

Education

Duke University to require COVID vaccinations for fall term

Education

Cooper OKs bill offering K-12 students summer school option

High School

High school football: Record night for Pinckney as East cruises; Carson wins thriller in OT