• 54°

Darts & Laurels: Children need their zzzzzs

Dart to family routines that don’t ensure enough slumber for young children. Lack of sleep doesn’t just make students sleepy and inattentive in class; if it’s a frequent practice in a child’s early years, lack of sleep may also lead to cognitive and behavioral problems later on. So say the people involved in a study led by a Massachusetts General Hospital pediatrician. The study found that “children ages 3 to 7 who don’t get enough sleep are more likely to have problems with attention, emotional control and peer relationships in mid-childhood,” reports Science News.

Dr. Lynn Moody, superintendent of Rowan-Salisbury Schools, wishes she could find a way to educate parents about the importance of sleep for their children.

“Provocatively, I have said to parents … if you will just do two things — put your child to bed at night and bring them to school every day on time — we will do the rest,” Moody says. “We will feed them, provide them with school supplies, even clothe them, but they must be here well-rested on time everyday.”

Parents, are you listening?

Laurels to teachers who go beyond curriculum to cover important life values and to students who take those lessons to heart. Kristina Sheets’ fourth-graders at North Rowan Elementary School have tackled at least two projects this year that demonstrate compassion — collecting donations for Hurricane Matthew victims and, more recently, raising nearly $2,000 for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. In addition to caring about those in need, the students have been putting the “fun” in fundraising. They sold orange awareness ribbons for leukemia for 25 cents each, organized themed-dress days with a 50-cent participation fee, and planned a cupcake party for the class that raised the most money. “When they leave this classroom,” Sheets says, “I want them … to be good people.” They’re off to an kind-hearted start. 

Laurels to “Sesame Street” for adding a character with autism to its Muppet cast. Julia plays along with the rest of the crew but does some things differently. When introduced to Big Bird, for example, she  continues coloring and doesn’t make eye contact or speak. “I thought that maybe she didn’t like me,” Big Bird told “60 Minutes” correspondent Lesley Stahl, in a recent special. Elmo jumped in to explain autism and said sometimes it takes Julia a little longer to do things. Bravo to “Sesame Street” for trying to educate young children about autism and for giving children with autism a chance to see someone like themselves on TV.

Comments

Education

Superintendent talks first 100 days, dives into district data

Business

‘It was an answer to a call:’ TenderHearted Home Care celebrates 10 years of providing care at home

News

Political Notebook: Local polls find increasing number of North Carolinians want COVID-19 vaccine

News

Trial begins on challenge to latest NC voter ID law

Local

Burch, Fisher, Marsh honored as 2021 recipients of Elizabeth Duncan Koontz Humanitarian Award

Landis

Landis board talks revenues, budget planning, department updates

College

College baseball: Catawba rolls 7-1 and 24-1

Nation/World

Student fires at officers at Tennessee school, is killed

Nation/World

Police: Minnesota officer meant to draw Taser, not handgun

Crime

Man receives consecutive prison sentences for sex offenses

BREAKING NEWS

RSS Board of Education approves Faith Elementary sale

Coronavirus

Rowan Health Department receives 400 Pfizer, 800 Johnson & Johnson vaccines for week

Crime

Blotter: Accident in Food Lion only weekend shooting to produce injuries

Crime

Salisbury man charged with felony drug crimes

Crime

Second person charged in thefts from house near county line

Crime

Police use tear gas to end robbery stand off, arrest suspect

Local

Ask Us: When will Rowan Public Library’s West Branch open?

Nation/World

Prosecution case nears end in ex-cop’s trial in Floyd death

Nation/World

Officer accused of force in stop of Black Army officer fired

Crime

Blotter: Man charged with hitting man with car, fleeing while intoxicated

Local

‘Meet the need’: Rowan County Health Department looks to add to vaccination options

Local

Seaford is first woman in county hired for town manager position since the ’90s

Local

Colonial Spring Frolic makes a comeback to kick off museum’s year

Local

Concord City Council wants to name bridge for fallen officer, Rowan native