• 68°

Letters to the editor – Saturday – 10-8-16

Once upon a time, when secret meant secret

In 1962, I received a commission as an Army second lieutenant. That commission came with a Secret security clearance after an Army investigator had taken extensive study to assure that my “background warranted trust in handling classified material.”

I was off to Fort Benning to attend basic infantry officers’ school, parachute school and ranger school. While there, I began to handle classified documents. After Benning schools, I was off to Fort Campbell to become a platoon leader in the 101st “Screaming Eagles” Parachute Division.

As I rose in higher rank, my jobs required an ever-increasing need to use classified documents and a higher classified clearance — Top Secret. I retired from the Army at that level.

The Army called me back to serve as an armaments engineer and I served there for 20 years. My service as a civilian engineer during the latter time of my service required that I be granted several levels higher than Top Secret. (I will not divulge that level.)

So, what?

Knowing the proper manner one must handle classified documents, all my Army cohorts knew precisely how to handle classified. There were no “ands, ifs or buts” about how to safely handle such documents. We were told how to handle and told the punishment if such were disused. Punishment could be severe.

I cannot believe Hillary is getting away with murder in the way she has abused the privilege of using classified documents. And, 33,000 e-mails missing! Who knows how many tidbits of classified info have been culled from the missing 33,000.

And she has even tried to “pin the rose” on General Colin Powell.

So our would-be president gets away with murder. When I was in service, had I treated classified information/documents like Hillary, I would still be in prison.

— Ty Cobb

Salisbury

Food gifts appreciated

Each year, the Rowan County Fair Association has made it possible for citizens to visit the fair free of charge by helping a neighbor in need. On Sept. 25, patrons of the fair gained access to the annual fair by bringing cans of food for the Rowan Helping Ministries food pantry.

This year over 2,200 pounds of food was collected and brought to Rowan Helping Ministries so that we can distribute it to families who need food. In Rowan County, it is estimated that nearly 17 percent of families do not have adequate resources to meet their food needs. Monday through Friday, people come to the Rowan Helping Ministries’ food pantry to get food so they can make ends meet and provide balanced meals for their families.

We are very grateful to the Rowan County Fair Association for allowing citizens to enjoy the fair by bringing canned food rather than paying entrance fees. Volunteers from the West Rowan High School ROTC program, led by Col. Herman Peterson, collected food that day, and we appreciate their support and hard work.

And we are thankful for the citizens of our community who donated enough food for 60 families to have food on their tables this month. It is an honor to be part of a community where residents look out for their neighbors and work together to improve the lives of all citizens.

— Kyna S. Grubb

Salisbury

Grubb is executive director of Rowan Helping Ministries.

Comments

Crime

Cooper, N.C. prison officials agree to release 3,500 inmates

Coronavirus

Two more COVID-19 deaths reported in Rowan, six for the week

Crime

Blotter: Man brandishes AR-15, runs over motorcycle at Rockwell-area gas station

Crime

Salisbury man charged with exploitation of minor

Crime

Road rage incident results in assault charges

Local

Dukeville lead testing results trickle in, more participation needed

Education

Faith Academy interviewing staff, preparing site for fall opening

News

Volunteers work around obstacles, alter procedures to offer free tax services to those in need

Education

Education shoutouts

Local

Retired Marine gets recognition for toy collection efforts

Local

March issue of Salisbury the Magazine is now available

Education

Five get Dunbar School Heritage Scholarships

Education

Education briefs: Salisbury Academy fourth-graders think big as inventors

Education

Bakari Sellers keynote speaker at Livingstone College Founder’s Day program

Nation/World

Biden aims to distribute masks to millions in ‘equity’ push

Nation/World

Chief: Capitol Police were warned of violence before riot

Nation/World

GOP rallies solidly against Democrats’ virus relief package

Nation/World

FDA says single-dose shot from Johnson & Johnson prevents severe COVID

High School

Coaches, lawmakers react to governor’s order expanding sporting event capacity

Coronavirus

Three new COVID-19 deaths, positives remain below triple digits

BREAKING NEWS

Gov. Cooper announces end to curfew, changes to restrictions affecting bars, high school sports

Crime

Blotter: Two charged after call about package

Crime

Salisbury Police investigating two shootings

Crime

Chase involving Kernersville man ends in woods behind Carson High School