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Boys Summer Program to develop mind and body

By Amanda Raymond

amanda.raymond@salisburypost.com

SALISBURY — Fran Moore thinks there is a lack of community programs for boys from the ages of 12 to 15.

“They’re too old for childcare but they’re too young to work,” she said.

Moore said it is hard to convince other people to watch boys at that age because they think they will be too much to handle. When the boys are left to their own devices, Moore said that is when many of them run into trouble.

So she decided to start the Workshop Ministries Boys Summer Program, as part of her newly formed Workshop Ministry.

The summer program will start June 13 and end August 12 at 2210 Statesville Blvd. The program will continue throughout the school year as an after school program that will feature weekend trips during which the boys will get to do things like fish or visit colleges.

Moore said she wants to work on both mind and body during the program.

The boys will learn about attire and appearance, entrepreneurship, self-presentation, character-building and respect. The boys will be broken into groups to complete research projects and will have to choose a team leader for the group every day. They will also hear from different speakers.

“What I want to do is tackle the area that’s needed, which is their mind,” she said.

Moore will also encourage the boys to be accountable towards one another and help each other succeed.

“These boys are going to learn how to depend on one another,” she said.

Moore said every child will receive a Bible and a binder. She will reference the Bible for all of the activities and projects the kids do.

There will also be time set aside for military style physical exercise every day. Moore said there won’t be anyone yelling at the kids, but the kids will be required to perform exercises that do not require equipment, like running, walking, pushups, sit-ups and jumping jacks. They will also learn self-defense.

“It’s going to help shape them physically so they can mentally meet the challenge,” Moore said.

There will be a no-tolerance type of discipline — if a child misbehaves one time, they will not be able to continue with the program, Moore said.

She said she wants the children to leave the program with as “respectable citizens” and with a better sense of self.

“They’re going to learn when they come out of there that they are somebody,” she said.

Moore is an ordained minister. She is a U.S. Army veteran and now works with other veterans at the Hefner VA Medical Center. While working in logistics for the military, Moore performed, sang and modeled in Europe. She has also worked in a law office, was a real estate broker and owned several food trucks at different points in her life.

Moore said she has encountered hardships in her life, including bouts of homelessness and divorce, but through it all she has kept her faith.

In 2014, Moore said she decided to straighten out and do something meaningful with her life.

One of the first things she did was write a book, which she said she wrote to leave a legacy behind for her two children, Michael and Eszavion.

In the book, called “A United States Citizen Opinion,” Moore gives her view on the state of the country and where she thinks the country is headed. She also writes about how she does not think the country’s founding fathers’ beliefs apply to the country today.

She hired Deseré Cross as her publicist and Cross is also helping her publicize the ministry.

The other part of her new direction was starting a Workshop Ministry. Moore said that many of today’s places of worship are dysfunctional and have formalities that distract from what people really need.

She believes a church or temple should prepare people for real life, which includes taxes, credit reports and finances.

Moore’s Workshop Ministry may have an open space where people can worship and sing as they please, with no chairs except for those who are handicapped or elderly. In another area of the building, attendees would sit at round tables with a binder and a Bible and talk about subjects like finances, life insurance, how to prepare for a funeral and repairing credit scores.

She also wants her ministry to be able to provide funds for people to help them do things like buy houses and get out of debt. Moore said though some might take advantage, offering funds is worth helping those who will actually use the money to better their lives.

“Workshop Ministry is working to remove the bondage” and help people find their purpose, Moore said.

Moore also said the youth will be more involved in the ministry and learn from the adults. For example, if there is a deacon board, there will also be a youth deacon board.

And it would all happen on a day of the week other than Sunday.

The summer program is the first program from the Workshop Ministry.

Moore said the school system is providing breakfast and lunch for the program and she is working on getting donations from local businesses.

The program is open to all nationalities, but there are only 200 spaces available.

In order for the program to be a success, Moore said she needs the help of the community.

“If you can’t come out and help, then make a donation,” she said.

Moore eventually wants to develop the ministry into something that can spread throughout the country. She wants to write more books and get involved in politics. She is also working on a music album.

Ultimately, Moore said she wants to make a difference.

“There’s a lot going on in my life and I just want to see a change before I get out of here,” she said.

Those interested in signing up for the program can register in person at Thelma’s Down Home Cooking at 1935 Jake Alexander Blvd. S. on June 6 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. and June 11 from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. Those who want their children to participate can also register by calling 980-613-1398 before June 13.

Registration is $35 and the program costs $75 per week.

For more information about the ministry, visit http://franmoore.tateauthor.com/ministry/.

Contact reporter Amanda Raymond at 704-797-4222.

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