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Learn more about George Washington at History Club

The Rowan History Club will meet Tuesday, May 10 at 7 p.m. for a program by Terry Holt on “Wooden Teeth: Myths, Legends and Stories of George Washington.”

“The president is coming!” The Father of our Country decided that he needed to visit every state in the new nation. He felt that through the power of his own popularity he would share with the citizens the importance on making their new nation one that would last forever.

George Washington was so inspiring that people wanted to share their own ideas of what he meant to them. Many of the stories were repeated over and over and often found their way into our histories of the first president. People wanted George Washington to be all that and then some. You know, he never told a lie, he had a set of wooden teeth, he threw a silver dollar across the Potomac River, he had breakfast with Betsy Brandon on his way to Salisbury. Well, did he?

This month’s Rowan History Club will take a closer look at the life of George and his myths, legends and stories. On May 30-31, 1791, the president had to visit Salisbury, the western most cultural and political center in North Carolina. He was greeted with a celebration and ball.

When you meet the man on his 225th anniversary visit to Salisbury on May 21, you will understand more about his importance to the very heart of our country even in today’s world. You will not need your hatchet for chopping down cherry trees, silver dollars to toss across the river or eggs for breakfast, but you should bring your teeth even if you have more than one. George would appreciate that. Come and share a night getting to know the man who was eulogized with the words, “First in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his countrymen.”

The meeting will be held in the Messinger Room (accessible by elevator). Meetings are held on the second Tuesday of each month, September-June. The museum is at 202 N. Main St. Guests to the program should enter through the rear entrance.

A roundtable format will allow for a 30- to 45- minute presentation, followed by a question and answer period. The Rowan History Club is open to all persons interested in the history of Rowan County. There are no dues or admission fees, and refreshments are served.

For more information, contact the Rowan Museum at 704-633-5946 or email rowanmuseum@fibrant.com .

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