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Salvation Army sisters headed to South Carolina

Salisbury won’t stand by while its neighbors are suffering, local relief organizations say. Since Hurricane Juaquin struck South Carolina over the weekend, organizations in Salisbury have been providing what aid they can.

Melissa and Daisy Cline are sisters-in-law, but they share more than just a familial bond — both have been involved in Salvation Army for more than 15 years, Corps Officer Captain Bobby Carr says. And now, both are heading down to South Carolina to help with hurricane relief efforts.

The sisters have been employed with the Salvation Army since 2012, and received training in disaster relief. But this is the first time they’ve had the opportunity to put that training into practice. Melissa said they didn’t know much about what the situation would be like on the ground, but they have faith in their training. Still, they know it will be hard.

“I’m nervous about what I’m going into,” Melissa said, “because it will break my heart to see people down and out.”

The Clines will be joining current Salvation Army efforts in Georgetown, South Carolina, where the Salvation Army in South Carolina is working with the Red Cross providing food and water relief at the Beck Recreation Center in Williamsburg County. Currently, Carr says, this shelter is providing food and water to nearly 2,700 people in the Georgetown area.

The Clines don’t know exactly what their jobs will be once they arrive in Georgetown, or how long they’ll be there — they were just told that they should be prepared to work in the area for at least 14 days. But for these two, the uncertainty isn’t important — it’s the heart.

“All I want to do is help,” Daisy said, “If I don’t do anything other than pray with someone, that’s something.”

She stated that she believed God had placed them in this role in this particular time to do good, and to be able to provide aid and blessing to the people they’ll meet in South Carolina.

Carr says the Rowan County Salvation Army will be sending more volunteers and teams as they’re requested.

“With the scope of this disaster, I’m sure we’ll be sending another team,” he said.

If Salisbury residents want to help, they can provide monetary donations at www.salvationarmyusa.org. Those interested in volunteering can contact the Rowan County Salvation Army at 704-636-6491. Those interested must complete disaster relief training and clear a background check. Carr says the Salvation Army will stay on in South Carolina after the initial need for relief has passed in order to help with getting the communities back on their feet.

When the hurricane was anticipated to hit Western North Carolina, the Southern Piedmont Elizabeth Hanford Dole Chapter of the Red Cross sent volunteers to Asheville and set up centers. When the storm stayed South, aid followed. While the Red Cross has yet to send volunteers to South Carolina, they are in the process of coordinating a team. In the meantime, they are accepting monetary donations to provide food, shelter, aid, and a boost to the state’s battered people and shattered economy.

Anyone who wishes to donate funds for the relief effort to the Red Cross can drop by their office at 930 Jake Alexander Blvd. W. Suite B, call 1-800-RED-CROSS, or visit the organization’s web page at www.redcross.org

Chief of Rowan Emergency Services Frank Thomason says tips on how Salisbury citizens can contribute to the cause have been shared on Rowan Emergency Services social medial pages.

To donate items, the South Carolina Emergency Management Division requests that you call call 803-737-8518803-737-8878, or 803-737-8875 to find out which items are needed. To make a monetary donation to a different, approved volunteer organization, visit the South Carolina Emergency Management Division’s website at http://www.scemd.org/recovery-section/donations-and-volunteers.

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