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Kluttz wins award for historic tax credit work

Kluttz

Susan Kluttz

Susan Kluttz

With North Carolina’s historic tax credit firmly in place, Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz received formal recognition this weekend for a statewide tour spanning more than 50 cities.

The North Carolina branch of the American Institute of Architecture this weekend presented Kluttz its Legacy award for her successful effort to renew the state’s historic tax credit, which expired in 2014. North Carolina’s recently passed budget includes a lesser version of the tax credit. For income-producing properties, it includes 15 percent credit for up to $10 million in expenditures and 10 percent credit for expenditures between $10 million and $20 million.

In order to revitalize the credit, former Salisbury mayor Kluttz toured the state. Gov. Pat McCrory joined her on several stops, including Salisbury. In connection with the award presentation, Executive Vice President of the NC AIA David Crawford said Kluttz’s work made “a huge difference to the architectural community.”

Kluttz said she was honored to have received the award, but shifted credit to McCrory, legislators who supported historic tax credits and the community and professional groups who advocated for the tax credit. She said media organizations also played a role in renewing the historic tax credit. Kluttz said she was “preaching to the choir during many of her tour stops.” The media helped spread Kluttz’s message to others who weren’t familiar or didn’t agree with tax credits, she said.

“At the beginning, we were told by some key legislators that it was impossible, that it could not be done and not to even try tax credits,” Kluttz said.

The historic tax credit is lower than its predecessor. However, the renewed credit is the exact version Kluttz and a coalition of groups drafted, she said.

With her tax credit work complete, Kluttz said she’s now focused on overseeing a restructuring that significantly increases the size of the Department of Cultural Resources. It involves more than three dozen state parks, aquariums, science museums and the state zoo.

Contact reporter Josh Bergeron at 704-797-4246

 

 

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