• 70°

Editorial: Don’t segregate history, too

The bad thing about Black History Month is simple: It’s relegated to one month, as if that’s the only time it should be studied, discussed and celebrated.

It has always been a patronizing observance and exercise, but one often grudgingly accepted by blacks, who fear that without it, even more of their rich history will be ignored.

Black History Month comes every February, so why bring it up in July? All the recent discussion about Confederate flags and monuments has served as a good wake-up call. Are we doing enough — and have we done enough up until now — to preserve African-American history?

The former J.C. Price High School is a good example. Price High is on the National Register of Historic Places. It was a Rosenwald School, a program that between 1913 and 1932 produced 4,977 schools, 217 teachers’ homes and 163 shop buildings, serving 663,625 students in 15 states.

Julius Rosenwald, the man behind Sears, contributed more than $4.3 million to the school-building program, and African-American communities raised an additional $4.7 million. The program was a major force in rural school design, and it successfully created positive, orderly and healthy environments for learning.

J.C. Price High’s impact on Salisbury history from 1932 to 1969 cannot be denied nor should it be separated out. Attending a meeting about Price High Friday, resident William Peoples said when people talk about Salisbury, they often talk about its history.

But you have to talk about the whole history, Peoples said. J.C. Price was part of it. So was Dixonville. So were Lincoln and Monroe Street schools. So are the city’s historic black churches and Livingstone College. What do we really know about black business history in Salisbury, black medical history or black sports history?

Historic Price High needs new windows, especially to its rear, and the auditorium, which once could seat 500 students, also could stand a complete renovation. As Peoples said, it’s not just a project for black people, it’s for the city’s history — something we all should have a stake in.

“You can’t have separate histories,” Peoples said. “You have to have the whole history.”

It’s hard to say it better.

Comments

College

College baseball: Top-seeded Arkansas routs NC State 21-2

Crime

Teacher accused of assaulting at-risk teen at New London military-style school

Education

NC court: Students can use constitution to fight bullying

Coronavirus

Vaccine surplus grows as expiration dates loom

Elections

Justice Department will review restrictive voting laws in Republican-controlled states

College

Wake Forest adding Ole Miss graduate transfer Khadim Sy to basketball squad

Local

Gov. Roy Cooper appoints new Rowan County Superior Court judge

BREAKING NEWS

Sheriff’s Office: Gold Hill woman likely killed during break-in

Crime

Fatal car crash turns into homicide investigation

Crime

62-year-old man killed in Wednesday murder

Business

Solar farm plans in Gold Hill met by resident concerns

High School

High school tennis: Salisbury’s Campion/Wymbs, Carson’s Perry/Conrad claim doubles titles

Local

Quotes of the week

Health

Local lawmakers weigh in on state budget process, potential for Medicaid expansion

Local

Salisbury-Rowan NAACP President Gemale Black discusses meeting with Department of Justice, calls for action

Education

School staff members to receive payments from unprecedented RSS bonus package June 23

Nation/World

Senators eye $579 billion in new infrastructure spending as part of $1 trillion plan

News

Veto likely for state bill on abortion limits

Coronavirus

Wealthiest nations expected to pledge 1B vaccine doses for world

High School

High school baseball: Raiders win first conference tourney in 18 years

News

North Carolina Senate gives final OK to $2B tax-cut plan

Education

Gov. Cooper visits Knox Middle School teacher, gives TikTok a try

Coronavirus

Salisbury Police officer dies after contracting COVID-19

Education

NC to give out $1 million each to 4 vaccinated residents