• 82°

Rowan County livestock judging and Skillathon contest

Rowan County Cooperative Extension, partnered with the Rowan County Cattlemens Association, held their first annual Livestock Judging and Skillathon Contest on March 7.

Youth from across the state came to the Rowan County Fairgrounds to judge cattle, pigs, and sheep, and to also test their knowledge in the Skillathon.

The Livestock Skillathon is composed of several parts.

First, there is a general knowledge section that tests the competitors’ overall knowledge of livestock production. The second part contains a multitude of identification tests; competitors must correctly identify livestock feed, tools of the farm, breeds and even meat. Understanding the various components in livestock production is the key to doing well in the Skillathon. Then, competitors moved on to livestock judging.

They evaluated Angus Heifers, Angus Steers, Market Guilt, Breeding Katahdin Ewes and Breeding Wool Ewes. When judging, competitors must rank four animals in the order that they believe them to be placed from best to worst. To determine this, competitors must evaluate the positive and negative traits of the animal. They must take into account the animal and its purpose and then evaluate body size, shape, feet, condition and a variety of other things to make their decisions.

After judging all five classes, the competitors had to give the judges the reason why they placed the animals the way they did.

Ed Birdsell, who works for the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Sherilee Deal, a beef producer and agriculture teacher, listened to the reasons and evaluated how correctly the individuals spoke about the placing of the animals.

After competition, the Rowan County Cattlemens Association fed the competitors and volunteers lunch. Following lunch, Birdsell and Deal went around with the youth and explained to them how the different classes of animals were placed and how to evaluate animals in future competitions.

The Skillathon provided an educational opportunity for youth to get a first-hand look at animal agriculture, while giving them the opportunity to gain experience in livestock judging.

For more information, call Thomas Cobb with Rowan Cooperative Extension at 704-216-8970.

Comments

Nation/World

Ex-FBI lawyer to plead guilty in Trump-Russia probe review

Nation/World

Tropical Storm Josephine closer to land in busy Atlantic hurricane season

Elections

Post Office warns states about mail voting

Coronavirus

UNC-Chapel Hill sees two COVID outbreaks in reopened dorms

Education

All three school board seats contested as filing closes

Coronavirus

Spencer nursing home has COVID-19 outbreak

Crime

Blotter: Arrest made in connection with Kannapolis shooting incident

Crime

Sheriff’s office: Man faces weapons charge after fleeing traffic stop

News

Forest abandons lawsuit challenging Cooper executive orders

Crime

Update: Funeral held for boy, 5, who was fatally shot in Wilson

Education

Salisbury-Rowan NAACP hosts virtual town hall with superintendent

Nation/World

Crews try to tame California wildfire as heat wave arrives

Coronavirus

Nursing home outbreak first reported last week sees first COVID-19 death

Coronavirus

1,400 face masks given out at county’s drive-thru giveaway

Crime

Blotter: August 14

Business

With more than 1,500 patrons in two weeks, High Rock Lake restaurant gets off to hot start

Business

State awards $584,100 grant to Three Rivers Land Trust for farmland preservation in Cabarrus County

Crime

Teen faces laundry list of charges after string of larcenies

Crime

Salisbury man faces charges after trying to retrieve phone from police

Crime

Police: Father hospitalized after being shot in argument with son

Education

RSS teachers adapting classrooms to the pandemic

Education

Shoutouts

Coronavirus

County launches paramedic program for those recovering COVID-19

Education

Cooper directs $95.6 million for students affected by COVID-19