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Hurley Park foundation will change hands, but continue

Salisbury City Council approved an agreement meant to preserve funding for Hurley Park for years to come during Tuesday’s meeting.

The Hurley family plans to close the Elizabeth Holmes Hurley Memorial Park Foundation and replace it with a fund under the Foundation For the Carolinas, based in Charlotte.

The Hurley family gave a donation to the city to fund the initial construction of the park in the mid-1980s. The family later set up a private foundation in order to provide grants to the city to help maintain the park — the foundation provides 50 percent of the annual funding for maintenance of the park.

The reason for the change is to ensure future funding for the park even after the deaths of Gordon Hurley and Geraldine Hurley.

Meg Dees, with the Foundation For the Carolinas, spoke to council on behalf of the Hurleys. She said the Hurleys will continue to manage the funds until their deaths, at which time the funds will become a permanent endowment.

The goal will still be to provide enough funds to cover half of the total cost of the park’s annual maintenance, Dees said.

Council unanimously approved a memorandum of understanding regarding plans for the foundation. And Council members each expressed their gratitude to the Hurley family and their fondness for the park.

Following a public hearing in which no one spoke, council unanimously approved a pool-hall permit for the Carriage Room, a bar off Statesville Boulevard near Little Caesars and Dairy Queen.

The bar has new ownership and therefore needs to re-apply for the permit, which allows it to operate its three pool tables in a for-profit capacity.

During the city planning board’s presentation to council regarding its annual highlights and goals. The topic of developing a land-use strategy for the county’s Interstate-85 corridor came up. It has been one of the planning board’s goals for years — but to become a reality, multiple municipalities and the county government would have to be on board.

The County Board of Commissioners had previously shot down a request from the city’s planning board to make a presentation about the plan to the commissioners. But now, with a new commission, planning board members think there’s a better chance to bring everyone together.

Councilman Brian Miller said, “This is something we need to get going.”

In other business Tuesday:

• Council did not take up an agenda item regarding an ordinance ordering the Code Services Division manager to have the home at 233 Nesbit Drive be repaired or vacated and closed or demolished. It appears the homeowners are working to resolve the problems.

• Council adopted a resolution of support for the state’s historic-preservation tax-credits program, which was discontinued Jan. 1. But state legislators appear willing to bring back the programs. Former Salisbury mayor, Susan Kluttz, now the state’s secretary of cultural resources, will be in town Monday as part of her push to bring back the tax credits.

“We need this.” Mayor Paul Woodson said about the program.

• Council passed a resolution adopting the county’s hazard mitigation plan. The plan covers a wide range of responses to a number of potential natural or man-made disasters. The county must have the plan in place to be eligible for federal and state aid. The plan was first developed in 2005 and must be updated every five years. The current plan covers Rowan and Iredell counties.

Contact Reporter David Purtell at 704-797-4264.

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