• 59°

Matching jobs and skills

Officials with Daimler Trucks North America told the Post last week that they were having trouble filling some 300 positions at the Freightliner plant in Cleveland. Freightliner is not alone. Nearly half of North Carolina employers — 45 percent — report having difficulty filling openings, according to a state report released earlier this year.
Anyone looking for a job needs to listen up.
“Employers report that the North Carolina labor pool is not matching growing demand for jobs that require strong skills (both ‘hard skills’ and ‘soft skills’), proper training and certification, sufficient levels of education and previous work experience,” the report said.
The 2014 Employer Needs Survey was conducted to help North Carolina’s Commission on Workforce Development. Among the reasons employers across the state cited for not hiring included these, in order of prevalence:
• Lack of work experience, educational credentials and technical skills, said more than 40 percent of employers. (Seventy percent of manufacturing employers cited technical skills.)
• Not enough applicants, said one in three employers.
• Candidates’ unwillingness to accept the offered wages, said one in four.
• Lack of soft skills such as communication, enthusiasm and interpersonal skills, said one in four.
• Candidates’ criminal records were an issue, said one in six.
• Inability to pass a drug test, said one in 10.
A small percentage cited other reasons, such as commuting distance. Failing to show up for the interview — one of the issues cited by Freightliner — apparently is not widespread.
The Freightliner jobs require a variety of skills. The NCWorks website lists openings at the truck plant for jobs such as maintenance electrician and technician, quality engineer, production supervisor, process engineer, material flow specialist, materials supervisor and human resources specialist.
Statewide, the employers who responded to the survey said they had trouble finding people with these skills: machining, blueprint reading, electrical skills, engineering technologies, customer service, computer operation and business/accounting. They also mentioned soft skills such as communication, enthusiasm, interpersonal skills, critical/analytic thinking and problem solving, and attendance dependability.
Employers are highly selective — and so are workers who have all these skills. After all, 55 percent of employers are not having trouble filling positions. It would be interesting to study their employment practices. Do they require fewer skills? Or do they offer better pay and job security?

Comments

Comments closed.

News

Man killed by deputy recalled as storyteller, jokester

News

Rowan’s Sen. Ford backs ‘Election Integrity Act’ to move up absentee ballot deadlines

Business

Salisbury earns ranking on national list of best small cities to start a business

Crime

Supreme Court makes it easier to give minors convicted of murder a life sentence

Local

Quotes of the week

Local

Salisbury Human Relations Council offering online Racial Wealth Gap Simulation

News

Bill seeking permanent daylight saving clears NC House

News

Friends describe Elizabeth City man killed by deputy

Business

With second hobbit house now complete, Cherry Treesort looks toward future expansion

College

Catawba Sports: 2021 Hall of Fame class announced

Crime

Supreme Court makes it easier to sentence minors convicted of murder to life in prison

Local

Overton dedicates tree to longtime volunteer Leon Zimmerman

Coronavirus

First dose COVID-19 vaccinations up to 24% in Rowan County

Crime

Blotter: April 22

Crime

Lawsuit: Salisbury Police, Rowan Sheriff’s Office tore woman’s shoulder during traffic stop

Business

‘Believe me, they’ll be fresh’: Patterson Farm welcomes strawberry crop

Local

City appoints more members to boards, commissions, with 9 seats left to be filled

News

Virtual play groups the new norm at Smart Start

Local

City meets in closed session to consult with attorney on two ongoing litigation cases

Education

Summit takes art out of the classroom, into the student’s home

Education

Education briefs: Gene Haas Foundation donates $12,500 to RCCC

Business

County’s restaurant grant program dishes out funding to eight local eateries

High School

High school football: Yow out as South head coach

Education

Shoutouts