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Future Foods to favorite foods

One part “attack of the killer tomato,” two parts “pure science …” Join Rowan Public Library to learn more about the latest technologies for producing food and how it will impact the future in a special workshop.
As part of the Literary Elements Summer Reading Program for Adults, the library had an exciting line-up of programs. The final program in the series, Future Foods, will cover trends and predictions for the future of food production. Some of the topics will include aquaponics, hydroponics, intensive production, high tunnels and grafting vegetables.
This program will be led by Danelle Cutting, local food and horticulture agent for the Rowan County Cooperative Extension. Cutting focuses on local foods, farmers’ markets, urban and consumer horticulture, Rowan County Master Gardener Program and pesticide trainings.
The program is Monday, Aug. 11, 6:30 p.m. in the Stanback Auditorium of Rowan Public Library Headquarters. There is no charge to participate, and all are welcome. Visit www.rowanpubliclibrary.org or call 704-216-8229 for more information.

A weighty matter
Experts agree that a good way to keep yourself honest is to use a food scale. Many people normally eat servings that are much larger than recommended amounts. A food scale helps the dieter to stop eating more than what was originally planned.
“I definitely promote food scales,” Liz Weinandy, RD, MPH says. Weinandy is a dietitian in the non-surgical weight-loss program at Ohio State University Medical Center in Columbus.
Food scales to fit any need or budget and can range from a simple scale for as little as $7, to multi-featured digital scales, some with portion control options.
Weinandy says that a food scale can be used for any meal plan or diet that specifies a serving size in ounces. A national survey of more than 6,000 adults found that people who measured their food were more successful at losing weight than those who didn’t.
Measuring food is an important part of learning about correct serving sizes, and therefore a food scale will show the portion that the dieter thought was four ounces may actually weigh eight ounces.
— Catholic Online
An ode to eggs
What is the one food you can’t cook without?
In 2012 Bon Appetit magazine asked famed French chef Jacques Pepin what food is most indispensable to him.
“I think that the egg is probably one of the greatest foods that we can have in the kitchen, whether we cook it by itself or combine it into a souffle or custard … For me, I can’t live without eggs,” he says.
What food item is most important to you? Let us know. Explain, like Jacques, what that food is and why and how you use it and we’ll try to build a story about must-have food items for a good cook — no gadgets, now, just food. Email to deirdre.smith@salisburypost.com or call 704-797-4252.

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