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Library has plenty of books to help with spring tuneups

SALISBURY — The month of May brings many opportunities to get out in the yard and “tune up” things as the spring growing seasons blossoms forth. There are any number of things around the yard and house that require an annual tuneup for things to work their best.
For example, gardening tools and lawn mowers benefit from a tuneup, as do the kid’s bicycles; even the bushes and flowers in the front yard benefit from a “prune-up.”
Since we cannot all be mechanics and professional gardeners who have mastered such knowledge, a quick trip to the library can provide the information and resources to aid in all of the tuneups you wish to undertake.
• First on my list is the care and sharpening of my garden tools. The book “Care and Repair of Lawn and Garden Tools” by Homer L. Davidson provides detailed directions for “tuning up” the tools found in our sheds and garages. Many of these tools were built to last a lifetime and not a single growing season, so a little TLC goes a long way to provide stress-free usage. The second part of the text provides instructions for tuning up a lawnmower, string trimmer and leaf blower. When the correct mixtures are not kept, the motor in question will become damaged and eventually fail.
• Another area to benefit from a springtime tuneup are the bushes in the yard which require pruning. “The American Horticultural Society Pruning and Training: The Definitive Guide to Pruning Trees, Shrubs, and Climbers” by Christopher Brickell and David Joyce seeks to cover this information.
Personally, I can never remember if I should prune plants in the fall or spring seasons. This book provides the answers with instructions so that our flowering trees and bushes will always be at their best.
• A third area that requires springtime tuneups are the bicycles in the backyard. My personal favorite is “The Haynes Bicycle Book” by Bob Henderson. It includes step-by-step directions for every repair and maintenance your bicycle may encounter. This would have helped greatly in my first encounter with pulling the front wheel assembly from the frame and losing the ball bearings as they ran across the floor and into the drain.
Another resource for bicycles is “Maintaining Mountain Bikes: The Do-It-Yourself Guide” by Mel Allwood. A guide for today’s newer bicycles that have components such as shock absorbers, disc brakes, sealed hubs and bearings, plus RockShox front forks. All of this is new to me so this book will be high on my list for new cycle information technology.
These are just a few of the chores on my list of springtime tuneups required each year. I could make multiple trips to repair shops and pay dearly for springtime maintenance chores, but a simple visit to the public library teaches me to perform the tasks myself and pocket the savings. Money in the pocket is always a plus, especially in the season of spring. Happy reading.
Fizz, Boom, Read! The library and the Friends of RPL invite children to celebrate science and reading this summer with Fizz, Boom, Read. Registration begins Monday at all library locations for children ages 12 months to rising fifth- graders. Throughout the summer, children earn prizes by reading. Using their lab journal, children can begin tracking their reading hours June 16 and continue through Aug. 15. Those completing their lab journal can pick out a book to keep, and can enter a raffle for prizes.
The library will also have a literacy workshop for parents of children up to age 5 on Monday, June 30, at 6:30 p.m. The workshop is free but registration is required and space is limited. You can register at any library branch starting Monday. Check with your library for special events or activities throughout the summer.
Teen summer reading: Teens may participate in Spark a Reaction summer reading program where they will explore science through programs and reading. Registration begins Monday at all library locations for rising sixth- to 12th-graders. Teens can begin tracking reading hours June 16. Each week, events will focus on science concepts, experiments and crafts.
Every teen who registers receives a booklet for keeping track of the library dollars they earn. Those dollars will be used to enter various raffles for prizes provided by the Friends of RPL and other local sponsors. Winners will be announced at the end of the summer Blow Out Blast at South Rowan Regional on July 31, 3:30–5 p.m.
Wayne Henderson: Headquarters, Thursday, 7 p.m., Stanback Auditorium. Henderson and Friends in concert. His guitar playing has been enjoyed at Carnegie Hall, the White House, and in seven nations in Asia. The concert is free and all are welcome. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
Find Your Stride: South Branch, May 19, 5:45–7:45 p.m. In the fifth and final workshop in the series, participants will learn about proper hydration, form, breathing and stretching for fast walking and running. This program will be led by David Freeze, local author and founder of ULearn2Run and Salisbury Rowan Runners.
All ages welcome, but anyone under 16 must be accompanied by an adult. There will be a chance to win door prizes. Participants who attend four out of five workshops are eligible for the grand prize drawing, which will be held at this workshop. While there is no charge to participate, registration is required. Visit www.rowanpubliclibrary.org or call 704-216-7734 to register or for more information. 
Book Bites Club: South (only), May 27, 6:30 p.m., “Still Life,” by Louise Penny. Book discussion groups for adults and children meet the last Tuesday of each month. The group is open to the public and anyone is free to join at any time.
There is a discussion of the book, as well as light refreshments at each meeting. For more information, please call 704-216-8229.
Library closings: May 24-26, closed for Memorial Day.
Displays for May: headquarters, Older Americans month by Jo Kearns; South, student art by South Rowan High School art class; East, “Winnie the Pooh,” by Kim Davis.
Literacy: Call the Rowan County Literacy Council at 704-216-8266 for more information on teaching or receiving literacy tutoring for English speakers or for those for whom English is a second language.

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