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Dillon Oliver Robinson, son of Oliver and Paula Robinson of Kannapolis, was among those awarded the Cornelius O. Cathey Award at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The award is given to the student who has made the greatest contribution to the quality of campus life through sustained, constructive participation in student programs, or through creative, persistent effort in development of new student programs.
“These outstanding students are deserving recipients who have displayed initiative, innovation, leadership and a true commitment to learning and academic excellence,” Chancellor Carol L. Folt said. “It is a privilege to recognize their talents with the Chancellor’s Awards.”
The Jesse C. Carson High School Marching Cougars have been invited to represent North Carolina in the National Memorial Day Parade in Washington, D.C. on May 26 and the American Legion National Convention this summer. The school will hold its third annual golf tournament to raise funds for all of the band members to participate.
The tournament will be held May 10 at McCanless Golf Club in Salisbury. Golfers should arrive at 8 a.m. and the shotgun start will be at 8:30 a.m. The cost is $45 per person and the registration deadline is May 7.
A variety of sponsorships are also available, from $15 to $500.
Golfers of all skill levels are welcome. The tournament will be played as a “best ball” competition, also known as a scramble. Each player on the four-person team hits from the tee. The team then makes their next set of shots from where the best ball landed. This process continues until the ball is in the hole.
Funds raised will also go toward helping defray the normal costs of moving the band to each competition or football game, and providing music and supplies for all of the band programs including the jazz and concert bands.
For more information contact Elaine Barton, golf tournament chairwoman, at elainebarton5@gmail.com or 704-209-1073.
Denise Merck Jacobs of Rockwell has accepted membership in the National Society of Collegiate Scholars.
The group is a member of the Association of College Honor Societies and is the nation’s only interdisciplinary honors organization for first-year and second-year college students.
Membership is by invitation only, based on grade point average and class standing. The National Society of Collegiate Scholars has nearly 1 million lifetime embers and 300 chapters in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.
Wynnefield Properties, a building developments company in Kannapolis, donated $15,000 to the Kannapolis Education Foundation.
Craig Stone of Wynnefield Properties presented the donation during the April 14 meeting of the Kannapolis City Board of Education. He said the business wanted to support the students and teachers of Kannapolis City Schools and be a contributing part of the Kannapolis community.
Stone presented a check to the Kannapolis Education Foundation in the amount of $7,500. He also presented a second check for $7,500 to Rotary District 7680. That money will be used to access a matching Rotary grant of $7,500, which will be designated for the Kannapolis Education Foundation. The result is that the total donation to the Kannapolis Education Foundation will be $22,500. All the money will be used to buy classroom iPads for students and teachers in Kannapolis City Schools.
Joe Trull, chairman of the Kannapolis Education Foundation and president of the Kannapolis Rotary Club, accepted the checks.
“We are extremely grateful for the support of Wynnefield Properties, and we thank Craig Stone for making these generous contributions. They will make a tremendous difference for the students and teachers of Kannapolis City Schools,” Trull said.
Catawba College seniors Heather Foster and Olivia Albertson will present their senior projects at a double senior showcase Saturday at 6 p.m. at Hedrick Little Theater. Admission is free.
Foster, who is from Mocksville, is an acoustic, Americana and folk artist. Foster will also have a release party at Go Burrito after the concert, around 11 p.m.
Albertson, from Thomasville, is a country artist.
Both artists will have their albums and other merchandise available for purchase.
Benjamin Warlick, of Black Mountain, was one of 15 students selected statewide by the N.C. Library Association as a Student Library Ambassador.
Warlick is a ninth-grader at Charles D. Owen High School and is the grandson of Mildred and the late Dan Warlick of Salisbury.
He will join library supporters and a N.C. Library Association delegation in Washington, D.C., to advocate for libraries in Congress May 5 and 6.
His winning entry was a website, http://studentlibraryambassadors.weebly.com/.
Students entered a statewide contest sponsored by the Legislative and Advocacy Committee of the N.C. Library Association by submitting essays, videos, web pages or poems to proclaim the value of libraries.
The 15 winners and a parent will join library leaders from across the state in Washington, D.C., to visit the members of Congress who represent North Carolina. Together, they will deliver the message of the importance of libraries in all of the state’s communities.
During April, schools everywhere celebrated National Drop Everything and Read day, School Library Appreciation and National Poetry Month.
Throughout the Rowan-Salisbury School System, schools raised awareness for literacy during the month in a variety of ways. On April 17, Overton Elementary School held its second annual Breakfast, Blankets and Books event. Raising awareness for literacy on a community level is one of the goals achieved during the event.
Invitations were sent home to students in all grade levels, inviting family members to come to the school, bring a book and a blanket and enjoy a breakfast snack.
More than 100 families responded. On the day of the event, the school’s gymnasium was a packed house as families entered the gym. Families received cinnamon bread donated by Panera Bread and found a place to spread out their blanket and begin reading. Families spent nearly an hour reading together.
With its first year winding down, Crosby Scholars has planned a few spring events to celebrate the students who have completed their program requirements.
The first will be a Crosby Family Fun Day at the Kannapolis Intimidators vs. the Hickory Crawdads baseball game on May 4, said Melisa Tate, Crosby program director. Students in the program will get free admission and family members will pay $3 per ticket. The game starts at 5:05 p.m.
A special celebration is also being planned for the high school Crosby students — more than 300 ninth- and 10th-graders — who have completed all their requirements.
Cornerstone Church will sponsor Crosby’s first-year celebration at The Event Center on Webb Road. The evening will include a dessert reception, special speakers and recognition of those who have helped make the Crosby Scholars’ high school initiative successful in its start-up year. Community leaders, Crosby school liaisons, volunteers, students and their parents will be invited.
For more information about tickets for the game or the senior high celebration, visit the Crosby Scholars website at www.crosbyscholarsrowan.org or call the office at 704-762-3512.
MISENHEIMER — Pfeiffer University’s senior art majors displayed their artwork April 23 as a prelude to graduation.
With campus gallery space unavailable this year, the students and Professor Joshua Crose presented a modified version of big-city art sales. Called ‘Junk in the Trunk,’ the exhibition allowed each artist to display his or her work for sale in a U-Haul truck.
“The students did a great job of creating their own personal galleries in a space that was visited by almost everyone on campus over the course of the day,” said Cross. “Students, faculty, staff and community members have had a great opportunity to discover the deep well of artistic talent at Pfeiffer.”
The students, who will graduate on May 10, include Annette Lowder, John Borza, Tiffany Edwards, Amber Huskins and Erin West. Their post-graduation plans run the gamut from expanding existing studios to starting work as a professional photographer to applying to graduate school.
Knox’s rising sixth-grade orientation was invaded by poodle skirts, Fonzie and Elvis as Knox welcomed rising sixth-graders from their five feeder schools to “Happy Days at Knox.”
The chorus performed several numbers along with Elvis, and student ambassadors told students and parents what to expect in middle school. Dr. Tyrone Freenan, the eighth-grade assistant principal and “uniform referee,” provided a fashion show of proper dress code. Fonzie, also known as seventh-grade Assistant Principal Adam DeLand, highlighted academics and clubs.
The school’s cafeteria was transformed into a soda shop and sixth-grade teachers served ice cream floats while exploratory classes were showcased. STEM activities were also showcased in the cafeteria and the gymnasium. Tonya German, the sixth-grade assistant principal, and Marlena Johnson, Knox’s chorus teacher, planned and orchestrated the event.
Teams from Gray Stone Day School and Park Ridge Christian School emerged as champions at the 2014 Youth Hunter Education Skills Tournament, the pre-collegiate shooting sports state championship, held Saturday by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission at Millstone 4-H Center in Richmond County.
Youth competed in team and individual categories for rifle, shotgun, archery and compass on high school and middle and elementary schools divisional levels, with overall team and individual awards based on aggregate scores in all events.
The Gray Stone “Gray” team won the senior division with an overall score of 3,856 out of a possible 4,000, while Park Ridge Christian won the junior division with an overall score of 3,610. Both schools are in Stanly County.
There were 554 students from 54 teams participating in this year’s tournament, having advanced from nine district events across the state where there was combined participation by more than 2,700 students from 290 schools. Overall attendance, including spectators, staff and competitors at the tournament was estimated near 2,500.
The Commission’s Hunter Education Program holds the tournaments as an opportunity for youth to showcase outdoor skills and demonstrate safety. Teams are organized within public and private schools, while home-schooled students and teams representing organizations such as 4-H or FFA also can compete, provided they meet eligibility requirements. For more information, call 919-707-0031 or go to www.ncwildlife.org .
What is a community? Angie Lovingood’s kindergarten class at Shive Elementary wanted to know just that.
Dividing the class into two groups, water and land, they identified the various landforms and water sources found in a community. Using two table tops as a base, water and land areas were created using various art mediums and recycled materials.
Next, the groups investigated jobs necessary to meet the needs and wants of a community. Students brainstormed the importance of different jobs and decided which they felt were most important in their community.
Out came the recycled boxes and buildings were created and added to the display. Finally, utilities were added using straws for power poles and yarn to create the power lines.
Their community was complete and their question answered. What is a community? Whether it is in the mountains, at the ocean or here in the Piedmont, it’s a place where people come together to work, raise families, play and get an education.

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