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Letters to the editor — Tuesday (2-11-2014)

Kudos to the Post for carrying the account of the “Moral March” in Raleigh. Front page Sunday edition no less! As a conservative Republican I can think of no better way in this world to rally Republican voters to the poles next November than to smear this propaganda across the face of Rowan County’s most widely distributed — and read — publication of “news.” It fills my heart with unspeakable joy to realize that my subscription to the Post is money well spent. That article is probably worth $10,000. of advertisement to Republicans. Who says the media is liberal?
It has to do one’s heart good to see all of those preachers leading their “moral” march, accompanied by saintly patrons carrying signs in support of aborting unborn babies, screaming for homosexual marriage to be the norm, demanding voters rights for illegal voters and showing their disgust — in general — to the Constitution of the U.S. (i.e. issues like the destruction of the Second Amendment and the God-given right of every law abiding citizen to self defense). In rereading Romans chapter 16, verses 17-18, I can’t help but believe that either those marching ministers — or myself — are misinterpreting the Apostle Paul’s intent as to the conveyance of that particular passage of scripture. Maybe judgment day will answer such questions.
Once again, thank you to the Salisbury Post for your wholehearted support of conservative Republicans in the great state of North Carolina I await next Sunday’s Post — with bated breath — hoping for another front page headline demonstrating liberal policies.
— Randy Biggerstaff
Kannapolis

First, full disclosure: My wife and I live with a pit bull mix and a border collie, both abandoned. With that said, pit bulls are probably the most misunderstood breed in this country. Although they are widely believed to be used as guard dogs, they are not. Law enforcement officers, the military, other government agencies and private security organizations use German shepherds, Belgian Malinois and similar breeds, not pit bulls.
People believe they are vicious; this is simply not true. They simply want to be loved and treated kindly.
The TV show “Pit bbulls and Parolees” offers continuing real life examples of pit bulls and other breeds rescued from the most horrifying situations and responding with gentleness and love. Often these very same dogs wind up being adopted by families. Unfortunately, not all dogs (and cats) get adopted, and in Rowan County the policy currently seems to be to “put them down.” To his credit, Commissioner Pierce seems to want to stop this practice.
Dogs that have been abandoned will forage for food and may join a pack, appearing much more dangerous than they actually are. Again, pit bulls provide many actual examples of these dogs being taken into care and often adopted, becoming family pets.
Take a moment and think about the kind of people who would abandon a family pet to fend for themselves. It is a testament to these dogs that they would ever trust, much less love, one of us.
For more information check out Pitbulls.org on the Internet or “Pit bulls and Parolees” on the Animal Network, Channel 107.
— Jack Burke
Salisbury

Most of us make a decision from time to time without first thinking through all the possible negative consequences. This must have been the case when NC state legislators decided to spend $10 million from the public education budget on grants to lower income children to attend private schools. First of all, there’s plenty of proof that the way to improve education for poor students includes increasing standards and expectations, providing them with the tools and facilities they need, and providing teachers with the necessary planning time and training. This bill addresses none of this. It drains more money ($62 million total) from public education and worsens a system that within the past year has driven over 12,000 teachers to quit teaching, many now working in Virginia and South Carolina.
Worse, this legislation allows anyone to open a private home school, enrolling students who receive so-called “opportunity grants.” People teaching in a home school will only need a high-school diploma. They could be teaching anything in these schools, and no one will know because there will, for all practical purposes, be no supervision. Any one of these new home schools might, for example, promote jihadist propaganda or immoral behaviors with taxpayers footing the bill. It’s hard to imagine how state legislators and governor McCrory can think this bill will improve education in North Carolina considering the many likely negative consequences.
— Richard Swart
Dobson

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