• 46°

Finding ways to glorify God as we go about living this life

Barbara and I have a Bible Study every Thursday at Transitional Health Services in Kannapolis.
Each week we receive a blessing from the residents as some of them respond to the devotion for that day. In the previous week we were discussing the number of years God has been with us and how long he will be with us.
An immediate reply came from one lady saying, “I am 100 years old and I cannot remember when God was not with me. Neither can I remember when I was not in church.”
Her remarks touched me, because she was proud to be a Christian and ready to tell everyone how long Jesus has been in her life.
Her words were much like that of the Apostle Paul who wrote, “For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to everyone that believeth” (Rom. 1:16a).
A fellow pastor told me that when his father had reached 100 years old, the local television station sent out a news team to get his reaction to having lived so long.
The reporter asked him “What do you think about living to be 100?” He responded by singing, “When we all get to heaven, what a day of rejoicing that will be.”
This godly man’s mind had been transformed from earthly things to anticipation of going to heaven.
Whether he knew it or not, he was following the instruction of Paul, “Set your affection on things above, not on things on the earth” (Col. 3:2).
Just a few weeks ago I was honored to participate in the memorial services for Bea Williams, a faithful member of Blackwelder Park Baptist, in Kannapolis.
Being the first speaker in the service, I was able to appreciate the words of the songs and listen intently to what each one of the family members who spoke and the message by the Rev. Stan Welch, her beloved pastor for many years.
I was blessed by Mike Barbee, who sang “Wish You Were Here” and “Beulah Land.” As he sang my mind wandered to the visits I had made to the church shut-ins with Bea and Brenda Belk.
I was impressed with the love these ladies had for those who could no longer get to church.
God was certainly glorified by the service this wonderful lady gave to Him as she worked with her church, her neighbors and anyone she saw in need. Rarely, do we see that type dedication to our Lord.
I looked forward to hearing Bea pray. She could voice some of the sweetest prayers I had ever heard.
They were not just words to impress those who were listening but were to express her love for those she was visiting while bringing their names and needs to the throne of God. I could easily tell she had a special relationship with her Jesus to whom she was talking. Yes, Bea was definitely a servant of the Lord.
As the memorial service progressed, the grandchildren, Jonathan, Bret, Polly and Aprille gave tributes to their “Ma Maw.” Each mentioned her fried chicken being “The best in the world,” but by far, their words were to describe the love this special lady had for them, and how she proved it through her actions.
From their testimonies, she had left an eternal impression that had led them to the same Lord she served and worshipped for her life.
Bea’s son, Ted, spoke for the six children who loved their mom as much as could be and how she provided for all their needs and was always being available to listen. Most importantly, their adult lives were molded by her example in her love for the Lord.
Those in the audience could easily have turned to Proverbs 32:28-29 and read similar remarks by King Solomon in describing his mother, “Her children arise and call her blessed; her husband also, and he praises her: Many women do noble things, but you surpass them all” (Prov. 32:28-29, NIV).
Yes, Bea Williams left a legacy within her family as well as her church that will not be forgotten. The Bible tells us, “The memory of the righteous will be a blessing” (Prov. 10:7, NIV). Thus, all who knew Bea can sing that old song of the past, “Precious memories how they linger, how they ever flood my soul.”
Don Davis is a retired pastor living in Concord.

Comments

Comments closed.

Business

Weak jobs report spurs questions about big fed spending

News

Judge limits footage that family can see of deputy shooting in Elizabeth City

Sports

Woodland, two others share lead; Mickelson plays much worse but will still be around for weekend at Quail Hollow

Business

Former NHL player to open mobster themed bar in Raleigh

Nation/World

California population declines for first time

News

GOP leaders differ on bottom line for state spending

News

Police: Man killed in shootout with officers in Winston-Salem

Crime

Man charged after thieves rob would-be gun buyers of wallets, shoes

Crime

Blotter: Four added to sheriff’s most wanted list

High School

High school football: Some anxious moments, but Hornets win state title

Local

Photos: Salisbury High Hornets win big in 2AA championship game

Local

County manager outlines projections for the upcoming fiscal year budget, suggests uses for stimulus money

Business

Miami-based Browns Athletic Apparel opens second screen printing location in Salisbury

News

At funeral, fallen Watauga deputies remembered as ‘heroes’

Coronavirus

COVID-19 cluster identified at Granite Quarry Elementary

Coronavirus

More than half of North Carolinians have now taken at least one vaccine shot

Local

City hopes to cover expenses in 2021-22 budget with surplus revenue generated this year

Local

Fallen tree proves to be a blessing for local nonprofit Happy Roots

Local

Quotes of the week

Coronavirus

Health department drops quarantine time from 14 to 10 days

Crime

Blotter: More than $100,000 in property reported stolen from Old Beatty Ford Road site

Local

City fights invasive beetles by injecting trees with insecticide

Local

City names downtown recipients for federal Parks Service grant

China Grove

China Grove Town Council weighs 2021-22 budget priorities, supports buying body cameras