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While on our daily walk with our dog from West Henderson to City and Hurley parks, my wife and I discussed the article in Friday’s edition asking for ideas to fight obesity. We find these walks most enjoyable. They help to keep us staying healthy, positive and involved in our neighborhood.
It’s so nice to see people enjoying the parks, the tennis courts and the children’s facility. However, there are no other exercise facilities offered.
We thought of our home in Clearwater, Fla., where the parks provide adult exercise equipment and cardiac courses. We thought we could suggest a smaller version here in our Salisbury neighborhood.
A “senior playground” with exercise equipment would offer an alternative to intimidating traditional gyms; it gives a pleasant and peaceful environment to exercise and greatly improve the quality of life for everyone. Not everyone can afford a gym membership.
It would be ideal to have an area adjacent to the recreation center at City Park that can accommodate the following low impact exercise equipment: dual ski walker, sitting rotator, leg press/lat press, pommel horse and dual exercise bars, with instructional signage.
Novant Health should be willing to participate in creating a “senior playground.” It would go a long way to show their goodwill and commitment to the residents of Rowan County. The city of Salisbury and Rowan County should contribute to this preventative care and quality of life program.
If they are seriously looking at the long-term benefits such as weight loss, positive attitudes and healthier seniors … then look no further.
The equipment outlined is inexpensive and can be purchased for less than $7,000. It can be installed easily by the Parks Department, and can be placed on land we presently are not using.
If the downsized “senior playground” works at City Park, then expand it to all the parks. It’s all about quality of life.
— Frank & Lisa Justin

Salisbury

In reply to Steve Pender’s Sept. 17 letter to the editor re Obamacare, let me set him straight.
Delayed implementation of the employer mandate is not because of the 2014 elections, but because of difficulties in implementation by the employers themselves. Employers wanted more time, so President Obama gave them that.
Insurance premiums will probably continue to go up, but at a slower rate. Insurance companies are not going to go bankrupt over this health-care law. They will continue to make money, but they cannot cancel your policy because of a catastrophic illness or refuse to give you insurance if you can pay the premiums.
Where did Mr. Pender get his facts on the cost of premiums for young people? Most young adults I know are more than happy about this new health-care law. They finally can go to their own doctor and get medical attention. You don’t have to be over 65 to need a doctor!
On the question of employers reducing the hours of their workers so they can come under the part-time rules — and avoid paying for health care — the law says full time is classified as 30 or more hours a week. Employers will have to decide if that is worthwhile or whether they would then have to hire more workers to meet their needs. Studies seem to indicate there will be some of that (reduction in hours) in the low-paying sector, but not that much.
Go to FactCheck.org for a breakdown of the myths floating out there about Obamacare. I received one today. They are honest about the facts, pro and con.
Don’t believe the so-called “facts” Mr. Pender and others put out. They don’t like Obamacare in any way, or President Obama for that matter.
— Juliet Connery

Salisbury

I commend the Salisbury Post for a front-page story about the terrible massacre at the D.C. Navy Yard. I commend you further for not covering the shameful performance of Barack Obama, glory-hound-in-chief, who in a moment of trauma and national tragedy could not refrain from bashing any who deigned to disagree with his economic policy.
— Steve Owen

Kannapolis

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