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United Way grants help two local nonprofits provide services

Every year, the Terrie Hess House child advocacy center sees an increase in the number of child abuse cases. The agency gathers information from a child who has been physically or sexually abused through interviews.
Earlier this year, 11 nonprofits were awarded grants from the Rowan County United Way’s Community Initiatives program. The United Way board allocates $100,000 to be used over two years for the grants.
The grant money allowed Prevent Child Abuse Rowan, which operates the Terrie Hess House, to purchase anatomically-correct dolls and database software that will enable them to better serve children. The agency received $3,500 in grant funds.
The dolls are one of many tools a therapist can use during an interview with a child who he or she believes has been sexually abused and the nature of the abuse.
The agency was also able to buy NCAtrak, a software that provides a standardized method for entering, organizing, retrieving and protecting information about each child. The information will be stored on the child, family and alleged perpetrator, the law enforcement investigation, the response and outcome of the case.
“This helps keep all of our multidisciplinary team members informed as to the current status of each case, helping to ensure timely service provision by all partners,” said Beth Moore a forensic interviewer.
The Family Crisis Council of Rowan County also received grant money. The nonprofit provides crisis support for victims of rape, incest and sexual assault and domestic violence. The agency also has an emergency shelter and 24-hour crisis hotline. The nonprofit received $5,000 in grant funds.
The nonprofit used grant funds to assist a shelter client with transportation, childcare and clothing so she could have the freedom to find employment. She was able to place 42 applications, go on nine interviews. The client received cab fare to go on the interviews and has since been hired and promoted at her job.
The client received services from the agency in March and was able to leave the shelter in June.
The grants are given to agencies with programs or services that address issues identified in the county needs assessment. The Health and Human Services Needs Assessment Survey was created to understand the issues residents believed should be community priorities including medical, employment and education.
The grants were first established in 1991 and are provided through money raised during the United Way’s annual fundraising campaign. United Way member and non-member agencies are eligible.

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