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Dunk the boss

It was a wild and wet lunch crowd Tuesday at Centurion Medical Products, where employees ended a nearly three-week food drive by soaking their bosses in a dunk tank.

The company ended its food drive Tuesday with 1,100 items collected and sent to Rowan Helping Ministries. Dunking the bosses was a reward for the drive’s success.

The company, which produces sterile kits for hospitals, has held a company-wide food drive in the past, but added the incentive this year. Four plant managers and department heads climbed into the dunk tank during the lunch hour.

“This is the largest participation. It was easy, especially when we told them why we were doing it,” said Paula Kluttz with employee resources.

Each employee who brought in three cans received a ticket for two balls to throw.

Kluttz and her morale team came up with the incentive that brought lots of laughter as employees tossed ball after ball at their managers. Plant Manager Paul Bracy, August Baur, who is head of quality, maintenance member Greg Childers and team leaders Dave Westerman and Jimmy Brown all volunteered to be dunked.

Employee Shirley Harshaw, who wore a shirt that said “You’re Going Down,” said the idea was a good one. She received seven tickets.

“I just wanted to help the homeless and less fortunate,” she said.

Ted Phipps is familiar with the need at Rowan Helping Ministries. He volunteers through his church to work at the shelter.

“It’s a good way to raise donations for the homeless shelter. It’s great that the company does stuff like this. It helps keep morale up,” Phipps said.

Kimberly Collins, director of resource development and community relations for Rowan Helping Ministries, picked up all the boxed items.

“It’s an overwhelming surprise that’s going to benefit a tremendous amount of families,” she said.

Salisbury Vending provided lunch for employees.

Centurion Medical Products has been in Salisbury since 1986. The company is headquartered in Michigan and has 108 employees at its only North Carolina plant, located at 3310 S. Main St.

Contact reporter Shavonne Potts at 704-797-4253. Twitter: www.twitter.com/salpostpotts

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