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Letters

Where would King stand today?
To me, Martin Luther King, Jr. remains an American hero who died fighting for freedom. During his lifetime, though, he was considered an extremist, even by other civil rights leaders. He once wrote, “I gradually gained a measure of satisfaction from the label. Was not Jesus an extremist for love?”
I’m told that if Dr. King had lived, he would support the Democratic Party today. But I’m not so sure. He was, I believe, first and foremost a Christian. Dr. King used love, not blame, to deliver his message. Maybe he’d still be considered an extremist.
I’m told he would support abortion, because in 1966 he won an award from Planned Parenthood. But in 1966, Planned Parenthood was strongly anti-abortion. Their advertising brochures at the time proclaimed that unlike contraception, “An abortion kills the life of a baby after it has begun. It is dangerous to your life and your health.”
I’m told he believed in Marxism and Communism. But he wrote that he “could never accept” communism because “it has no place for God.” He wrote, “Man must never be treated as a means to the end of the state, but always as an end within himself,” and, “I didn’t get my inspiration from Karl Marx; I got it from a man named Jesus…”
I’m told he would support re-distribution of wealth because he discussed it while he was alive. But had he lived, he’d see that 40 years later “the war on poverty” has only increased poverty, while our national debt has risen from one-third of a trillion dollars to $16.5 trillion. Today, I think Dr. King would be looking for better solutions.
I’m told he would join the liberal’s mainstream media in ignoring the video of a conservative black man, Kenneth Gladney, being shoved to the ground, kicked and called racial slurs by white men.
But this wouldn’t be the Dr. King that I’ve come to revere.
— Steve Pender
Rockwell
Military guards
So much has been said lately about school security and what needs to be done. Its a known fact it would cost millions of dollars to provide and train future law enforcement or security personnel.
I have wondered why no one or perhaps they have thought about using our military men and women in this capacity. They have gone through training in weapons and would make a school look and feel safe and would be a welcome addition to our schools in these trying times.
I’m sure they could be assigned near their home areas, would already be familiar with the school districts, and it would free up our law enforcement people to be assigned to other tasks. Plus I can think of no better way for them to serve their country. What a wonderful example and role model these men and women could be to others.
I think it’s a great idea and would like to see someone in our government put this to work.
— Leah Fry
Woodleaf
Correction
I would like to thank the Post for the story about Moonpie and my quest to find her a home. One fact needs to be corrected. I am a Vietnam era veteran. I never served in Vietnam. Thanks
— Jack Cornatzer
Salisbury

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