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Wounded Warrior Program will be topic of meeting in Salisbury on Nov. 12

SALISBURY — Capt. Carol Livsey-Loeblein, program manager for the Wounded Warrior Program, and Sgt. Gabriel Ledesma, a wounded warrior, will be guest speakers at the Nov. 12 meeting of the Central Carolina Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America.
The chapter was formed in Rowan County in 2004 and meets six times a year. The Nov. 12 meeting will be held at noon at Rufty-Holmes Senior Center, 1120 S. Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
There is room for visitors who would like to hear the November program. For reservations, people are being asked to mail their names and a check for the meals ($7 each) to LCDR Robert T. Loeblein, USNR Ret., 702 Hidden Creek Circle, Salisbury, NC 28147 by Nov. 2, or after that date, call Loeblein at 704-636-4766.
At present, the local chapter has 68 members. The president is Capt. David Lee, U.S. Navy Ret., who can be reached at 704-636-6650.
As a Marine, Ledesma completed three overseas combat tours — two in Iraq and one in Afghanistan.
He served in a variety of capacities, including marksman coach, gunnery section chief, detainee operations official, battalion training NCO, commanding general personal security sentry and FOB entry control point NCOIC.
After being injured in combat, Ledesma received treatment at the Landstuhl Regional Medical Facility in Germany. He then transferred to the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., and received rehabilitative treatment at the Richmond Veterans Administration Medical Center in Virginia.
As an intern with Operation Warfighter, Ledesma served with the Office of Defense’s Wounded Warrior Care and Transition Policy.
Following a two-year treatment regimen, Ledesma transitioned into civilian life as an analyst for RGS Associates. He now serves as a civil servant program analyst with Naval Sea Systems Command in Washington, D.C.
Ledesma is a Purple Heart recipient, has been awarded numerous other combat medals and is a nominee for the Bronze Star with V device for Valor.
Livsey-Loeblein is married to U.S. Navy Capt. James T. Loeblein, a Salisbury native.
She received her commission as a naval officer in September 1985. She then earned warfare qualifications in information dominance and integrated undersea surveillance, as well as subspecialties in anti-submarine warfare and naval technical intelligence.
As program manager for the Wounded Warrior Program at Headquarters, Naval Sea Systems Command in Washington, Livsey-Loeblein has served on numerous Navy, Joint and Coalition staff throughout her career.
Her background includes three command tours, service as deputy director for Intelligence for two combatant commanders and work in three NATO-related posts.
Her career includes active-duty and reserve component experience in a variety of intelligence roles with worldwide operational and leadership assignments.
While deployed to Afghanistan, she served as deputy director for intelligence to the commanding general for theater combat operations. She has received numerous Navy and Defense medals.
Livsey-Loeblein completed her post-graduate degree in international relations at Salve Regina University in Newport, R.I., and has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and political science from the University of New Mexico.
The Military Officers Association of America is a nonprofit veterans association dedicated to maintaining a strong national defense and to preserving the earned entitlements of members of the uniformed services and their families and survivors.
Membership is open to those who hold or have ever held a warrant or commission in any component of the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, Public Health Service, or NOAA and their surviving spouses. The national office is in Alexandria. Va.
The Central Carolina Chapter of MOAA meets for lunch at the senior center on the second Monday of January, March, May, July, September and November.
The meeting always includes a program on military or veterans matters. The chapter provides help to needy veterans and works with the Junior ROTC units in Rowan County high schools.

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