• 64°

1956 alumnus receives O.B. Michael Award

Catawba College News Service
A 1956 Catawba College alumnus and six-time U.S. Ambassador, William Lacy Swing, received the O.B. Michael Award for 2012 at the college’s commencement exercise on May 12.
Swing, a native of Lexington, has enjoyed a long career at the U.S. Department of State, serving as a six-time ambassador and managing some of the largest diplomatic missions and foreign development and humanitarian aid programs in two hemispheres. He has served as ambassador to Congo-Brazzaville, Liberia, South Africa, Nigeria, Haiti and Congo-Kinshasa. He lives in Geneva, Switzerland, where he is director general of the International Organization for Migration.
The O.B. Michael Award has been presented annually since 1938 by the Catawba College Board of Directors of the Alumni Association. It is given to a graduate of the college who has made an outstanding contribution to the college and/or the larger society. Originally called the Citizenship Cup, it was established by the Rev. O.B. Michael, class of 1919, in memory of his father, an alumnus of Catawba and pioneer teacher and preacher.
While a student at Catawba, Swing earned his bachelor’s degree with three majors – one in religion and philosophy, one in English and one in history. He graduated from Catawba magna cum laude and went on to Yale University where he earned a bachelor of divinity degree. He completed post-graduate studies at Tubingen University in Germany and at Harvard University.
When he served as the United Nations Special Representative of the Secretary-General for the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Swing successfully led all facets of the largest UN peacekeeping operation in history.
Prior to his work in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, he served from 2001 to 2003 as the special representative to the Secretary-General for Western Sahara and Chief of the Mission for the UN Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara. His diplomatic assignments in countries facing significant migration movements gave him a deep understanding of the many factors affecting international migration.

Comments

Comments closed.

Granite Quarry

Granite Fest makes a comeback with music, vendors and fun for kids

Education

State budget process could mean big gains or loss of funding for schools

Business

Biz Roundup: Downtown Salisbury vying for $25,000 cash prize

Kannapolis

Kannapolis native serves as a member of U.S. Navy’s ‘Silent Service’

Local

Snyder promoted to deputy city clerk

Crime

Woman arrested for flashing rear end at Sheriff’s Office after previous charges overturned

Lifestyle

Hall wins bronze medal in SilverArts

Clubs

Harold B. Jarrett American Legion Post 342 holds 75th anniversary celebration

Business

Salisbury-based Integro Technologies acquired by Kaman Distribution Group

Lifestyle

World War II veteran, longtime Rowan County farmer, celebrates 100th birthday

Local

Rowan commissioners will discuss body cameras for bailiffs, arrowhead donation, plumbing fix for lead levels

Business

Downtown move gives Salisbury Eyecare and Eyewear chance to expand offerings, add new doctor

Nation/World

Clinton recovering from infection 

Crime

Teen charged in shooting at Mount Tabor High School held without bond

Nation/World

Marine officer receives reprimand for Afghanistan criticism

Elections

Beasley top fundraiser in third quarter for Senate race

Farm & Garden

Nearly 1-ton pumpkin sets record at state fair

High School

High school football: Loeblein throws record six TD passes for Falcons; Cavs, Hornets romp

Nation/World

UK lawmaker stabbed to death in terrorist act

Crime

Cooleemee man arrested after trading gunfire with Davie County investigators in Rowan

Elections

Salisbury council candidates list crime reduction, hiring a new city manager among city’s top priorities

Crime

Blotter: Man charged with trio of vehicle break-ins

Coronavirus

Catawba College will require COVID-19 vaccinations in 2022

Local

City selects Sada Stewart Troutman as new Downtown Salisbury Inc. director