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Letters to the editor – Tuesday (5-1-2012)

‘Jump-start’ will never get economy rolling again
A man paid a small fortune to have his car fixed, but it soon broke down while he was driving home. He called the repair shop, but the mechanic told him, “There’s nothing wrong with your car, sir. You just have to get someone to jump-start it.” Growing impatient, the stranded motorist asked very sarcastically, “And just how many years will it be before I can drive without needing a jump-start?” The mechanic laughed and said, “As many years as you pay me to be your mechanic!”
I tell this story because I heard President Obama speaking a few months ago, claiming that his jobs act “Will jump-start thousands of transportation jobs across the country.” More recently, he told returning Iraqi veterans that “We must jump-start industries that create jobs.” In other words, we have to jump-start the economy.
Wow! The stimulus package failed so miserably that President Obama can’t even use the word “stimulus” anymore, so he’s using “jump-start” instead. But it still means the same thing. It’s still artificially stimulating the economy, which is why he’s already talking about raising the debt ceiling again. He has to borrow another $1 trillion (hello … China?) for his 2013 budget because our economy will collapse if the jumper cables are ever removed.
The truth is, a healthy economy doesn’t need jump-starting, and a weak economy can’t be. It’s been three years now. How much longer will we keep throwing away trillions of borrowed dollars? (Hint: Ask the above-mentioned mechanic.)
Our government borrows $4 billion per day. President Obama’s proposed “Buffet Rule” (raising taxes on the rich) would bring in less than $5 billion per year. That’s pathetic. The government spends twice that amount each day. When I see scores of clueless reporters obediently praising the Buffett Rule, I think of the old commercials with the sizzling, greasy frying-pan (“This is your brain … on drugs”).
— Steve Pender
Rockwell
Coaching lesson from dad
It was the spring of 1971. Little League baseball was upon us; my dad, Troy R. Elliott, was my coach; J.T. Barnhardt was his assistant. There were 20 players on the team. The name of the team was China Grove Jaycees. Our record was 7-7. My dad’s team still played 500 ball by playing every player on the team. This taught me something — he treated everyone the same. Under my dad’s leadership, I learned a lot about competition.
When I was a teenager I found something. I found a paragraph my dad had written about me. He said “that I was a good little hustler who was not afraid to give my all.” He said “it was a wonderful reward to coach his son.”
My dad treated me the same as any other player on the team.
— George R. Elliott
China Grove
Restaurant’s star dies out
I had some great customer service at my local favorite steakhouse on Saturday, but no more. Lone Star has closed its doors — forever. Verizon bought the building, and the Lone Star staff is out. It’s bad enough that hard-working people in food service don’t even make minimum wage in North Carolina, which is wrong. But the last time I checked, my cellphone doesn’t put food on the table.
— Crystal Wilson
China Grove
Caregiver support
The article “Advice for ‘carers’ of people with Alzheimer’s” (by Katie Scarvy in Tuesday’s Post) shared invaluable information that was presented in Salisbury by Lisa Gwyther, director of the Duke Family Alzheimer Support Program. Caregiving is a difficult journey that can be exhausting and rewarding at the same time. To successfully navigate the journey, an excellent support system is needed. That is where the Family Caregiver Support Program in Rowan County comes in. For information on how the Family Caregiver Support Program can help you as a caregiver, call Lutheran Services for the Aging at 704-637-3940. We will help you with the journey.
— Sara Agner
Salisbury
Agner is the care manager at Lutheran Services for the Aging.
More on redistricting
Regarding editor Elizabeth Cook’s Sunday column:
How would you solve the problem of counties such as Mecklenburg and Wake counties that have enough population for two or more congressional districts? You also do not point out that we are one of 11 states that have to present new lines to the federal Department of Justice to sign off before the lines are implemented. By the way, the attorney general at DOJ works for the president of the United States, who runs the DNC. I think the problem we have here is come from Washington not Raleigh.
— Bryant W. Miller
Salisbury
McLaurin for N.C. Senate
We were encouraged upon discovering that our voting precinct, Gold Knob, has been incorporated into the 25th N.C. Senate District. Even though our new district stretches all the way from parts of Rowan County to Laurinburg, we were happy with the realization that a top tier candidate, Gene McLaurin, is running to represent us in the North Carolina Legislature.
Mr. McLaurin has served as mayor of Rockingham for the past 15 years. His professional, political and volunteer experiences put him in touch with a diverse mix of societal entities, including the business community (as president of Swink-Quality Oil and past president of the Richmond Chamber of Commerce); the educational community (as a former trustee of Richmond County Community College and a graduate of UNC Charlotte); and the service, philanthropic and religious communities (as past president of the Rockingham Rotary Club and a current Rotarian, chair of the Foundation for Richmond County and elder and Sunday School teacher at the First Presbyterian Church in Rockingham).
Indeed, Gene has shown a penchant for bringing business growth to a community. During his tenure as the mayor of Rockingham, he helped to lead the successful effort to bring NASCAR back to Rockingham, worked with other community partners on plans to locate the Discovery Place KIDS Museum in downtown Rockingham and made infrastructure investments protecting local jobs and helping small businesses.
We encourage all Democrats and unaffiliated voters in the nine Rowan County precincts in N.C. Senate District 25 to consider voting for Gene McLaurin in the May 8 primary. These precincts include Barnhardt Mill, Bostian Crossroads, China Grove, Rock Grove, Morgan I, Morgan II, Rockwell, Gold Knob and Bostian School.
— Steve and Karen Puckett
Salisbury
Elect true conservatives
During the last few months many politicians have made an attempt to label themselves as a “conservative.” How are the voters able to determine if these politicians adhere to true “conservative“ values?
There are a few simple questions we might ask about their past voting record or stance on past issues. Have they ever voted with the liberals to be seen as a compromiser? Have they ever voted to increase the scope of government, even when the facts plainly show that the proposed legislation was promoted by using shady or false statistics? Do they say one thing and then vote in the opposite direction.? Do they align themselves with other politicians who are not trustworthy based on their past behavior? Do they vote based on the facts, or do their votes promote some agenda desired by other politicians?
Government is somewhat like the body’s immune system. It is needed to protect us in some situations. However, when the immune system does not work properly it can be harmful. During an auto-immune disease, the body attacks itself. In some ways excessive government regulation does the same thing to our freedoms and economic well-being.
There will always be some bureaucrat insisting that we need new legislation to make things work better or make us safer. A true conservative knows when to say, “no”.
If you want to vote for a “conservative,” take some time to look at their past voting record, their promotion of new legislation and their votes based on the facts. If they cannot pass this test we should label them more appropriately as “progressives.” When will we see that change is not always better?
— Joe D. Teeter
Gold Hill
Endorsement deadline
Letters of endorsement for candidates or issues in the May 8 primary must be received in the Salisbury Post newsroom by 5 p.m. today (May 1).

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