• 46°

Dicy McCullough: Loving parents care enough to say No

This past year I’ve had a lot of fun watching my grandson, Carson Michael, grow. He’s 13 months old now and, as they say, “into everything.” Yet that’s the way it should be. I’ve not only enjoyed watching Carson, but I’ve also enjoyed watching my daughter and her husband, Brian, learn and grow along with their son.
A couple of weeks ago my husband, Michael, and I were over at their house for supper. Kristin put Carson in his high chair and he soon began enjoying a meal of spaghetti. No matter what’s for supper, he loves it, and it’s obvious by his rosy cheeks that food agrees with him.
Like any 1-year old, for Carson there comes a point when supper’s over and it’s time to play. Sure enough, before everyone was finished eating, Carson decided he wanted to play a game of throw the noodles on the floor. Kristin very lovingly told him several times, “No, Carson.” He’d stop for a minute or two, but then go right back to his little game. Finally, Brian looked at him and very sternly said, “Carson, stop throwing food on the floor.” Guess what? He looked at his dad and after that he didn’t throw food anymore.
I wondered about the fast response, and that’s when I heard the back story. The week before, Kristin, Brian and Carson were eating at a restaurant when Carson began his little game. Kristin and Brian both told him to stop, but he didn’t listen. Finally, Brian raised his voice and said, “Carson, don’t throw food on the floor!” This time Kristin said Carson’s lip began to quiver, but he stopped throwing food.
I sat at the table a little while longer watching my grandson interact with his mom and dad and thought about how much that little boy is loved. He’s loved so much that his parents are setting boundaries. Today it’s a simple lesson of not throwing food, but tomorrow it may be learning respect for others.
While it’s true there are variables in raising children such as friends and school, having a home with parents who care enough to discipline gives children an edge they wouldn’t have otherwise. Learning boundaries in small things will make it easier when Carson transitions into school.
A friend of mine, Lucy Shue, said she remembers her son’s pre-school graduation at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church a few years ago when Alan King addressed these same kinds of issues. Dr. King at one time was principal of China Grove Elementary School and later South Rowan High, but now he is part owner of Creative Teaching Aids. For the graduation speech, he adapted concepts from a program the PTA at China Grove endorsed about 30 years ago called Parent to Parent. That program taught parents the necessary tools to raise independent, responsible children.
One of the main points Dr. King included in his speech was that a parent shouldn’t be their child’s “attorney, banker or insurance agent.” In other words, teach children to save for things they want. If they get into trouble don’t always bail them out, but let them suffer the consequences of their actions. If they wreck the car, don’t go right then and replace it. To some this may sound harsh, but the bottom line is these principles teach responsibility and build character.
I can hear Carson moaning and groaning now, but as a parent and grandparent I think Dr. King should sign up to speak at more preschool graduations. What do you think?
• • •
Dicy McCullough is the author of “Tired of School.” Contact her at 704-278-4377.

Comments

Comments closed.

Crime

Salisbury Police chief addresses K-9 video, says officer separated from animal

Local

Rowan Rescue Squad sets record straight on fundraising typo

Local

City approves DOT agreement, Salisbury Station project could begin next year

Local

County plans to use vulture effigy, enforce violations to remedy animal carcass feeding problem

Education

Two weeks after ending enhanced protocols, Catawba has no COVID-19 cases

News

Council to hear revised version of Downtown Main Street Plan

Local

Veto override of NC school reopening bill fails in Senate

News

Political Notebook: Majority of likely voters, local legislators support school reopening bill

Coronavirus

COVID-19 vaccinations in Rowan top positives since start of pandemic

Crime

Man faces drug charges after breaking and entering call

Lifestyle

Waterworks schedules 2021 Summer ARTventures

Crime

Blotter: Man faces drug charges after being found passed out in vehicle

Ask Us

Ask Us: What programs exist for litter cleanup?

Business

County begins accepting restaurant grant applications

Crime

Blotter: Salisbury man charged with nine more felony sex offenses

Nation/World

Biden team readies wider economic package after virus relief

Nation/World

Spacewalking astronauts prep station for new solar wings

Nation/World

Cuomo sorry for remarks aide ‘misinterpreted’ as harassment

Nation/World

Trump calls for GOP unity, repeats lies about election loss

Education

Rowan County administers 700 vaccines, with majority going to local educators

Crime

Shoplifting at Walmart presents challenge for Salisbury police

Local

Commissioners will hear details about changes to solar energy policies

Business

After overcoming obstacles, local barber Daniel King earns registered status

Lifestyle

39th annual K12 student exhibitions go virtual