• 46°

Editorial: Tuition hikes hit veterans

With the nation’s veterans already experiencing higher than average unemployment rates in a dismal job market, the last thing they need is yet another obstacle as they pursue additional education and training.
Yet that’s what has happened for hundreds of vets in North Carolina and other states. When changes to the G.I. bill took effect in August, they included a well-intentioned effort to help bridge the cost gap between public and private college tuition rates. But the revised bill also stipulated that only in-state tuition rates are covered. The new payment cap means that more than 400 veterans in N.C. universities — and many others at community colleges — face tuition bills thousands of dollars higher than anticipated because they don’t qualify for in-state rates, according to a recent report in the Fayetteville Observer.
Veterans advocacy groups have rightly raised an outcry urging Congress to revisit the G.I. bill change and restore the funding mechanism that made up the difference between in-state and out-of-state tuition. But there’s a simpler solution that some states have already adopted. At least seven states grant all veterans in-state tuition rates, regardless of how long they’ve been a resident of that state. North Carolina isn’t among them, but it should be. As a state with a large military presence, North Carolina should be a leader in facilitating higher education for veterans — many of whom put college on hold and uprooted themselves and their families to serve their country.
We’re glad to see that some N.C. congressmen — including Reps. Mike McIntyre, G.K. Butterfield and Walter Jones — are helping lead the fight to restore the out-of-state tuition funding in Congress. State legislators should take up the cause when they reconvene next year in Raleigh.
Many veterans are trying to get back on their feet stateside after putting their boots on the ground in Iraq, Afghanistan and many other places around the world. Ensuring they receive in-state tuition rates is small repayment for their sacrifices.

Comments

Comments closed.

High School

North Rowan romps into second round of football playoffs

Nation/World

FBI had interviewed former FedEx employee who killed eight

Crime

Gastonia man sentenced for crash into restaurant that killed his daughter, daughter-in-law

Nation/World

Some call for charges after video of police shooting 13-year-old in Chicago

Business

State unemployment rate falls to 5.2% in March

Coronavirus

NASCAR approach to virus vaccine varies greatly

News

Judge rejects Cherokee challenge against new casino in Kings Mountain

Elections

Jackson tops NC Senate fundraising; Walker coffers also full

Local

Kiwanis Pankcake Festival serves thousands of flapjacks for charity

Coronavirus

Rowan remains in state’s middle, yellow tier for COVID-19 community spread

Crime

Blotter: Man faces sexual exploitation charge for images on Instagram

News

Defendant convicted in attempted murder case on the run after fleeing from trial

Business

Downtown Gateway Building to be renamed for late Paul Fisher

Coronavirus

Rowan County COVID-19 data for April 15

Local

Rep. Warren’s bill would prohibit parking in electric vehicle charging stations

Local

Historic Preservation Commission approves Integro Technologies expansion, Paint the Pavement project

Education

Faith Academy, RSS will negotiate over what goes, stays in elementary school

Crime

Teacher killed in Alamance County shootout with Mexican drug cartel

Coronavirus

Bill would give more tax breaks on COVID-19 loans

Nation/World

No response as divers knock on capsized ship’s hull

Local

Quotes of the week

Crime

Blotter: Man found on church property with litany of drugs

Crime

Man charged in connection to 2019 overdose death

Business

‘It’s our big time’: Salisbury Farmers Market reopens Saturday