• 93°

Editorial: High regard for military

Little is known so far about the 32-year-old man who stormed a restaurant in Carson City, Nev., Tuesday morning and shot a group of uniformed National Guard members with an AK-47. As of Tuesday afternoon, the death count included two Guardsmen and one civilian. He seriously injured several more people, shot himself and later died. He had no known ties to the military or the restaurant, an IHOP.
Authorities are investigating whether military members were targeted.
Whatever motivated this disturbed person, the military should rest assured that most Americans hold members of the Armed Forces in high regard and are far more likely to thank them than attack them.
In a Harvard University survey of youths in 2007, the U.S. military came out on top when respondents were asked how often they trusted various institutions to do the right thing. They trusted the military 53 percent of the time, compared to the president at 30 percent (George W. Bush at the time), Congress 32 percent of the time and the media (alas) 13 percent of the time.
Every branch of the Armed Forces plays a pivotal role, and the Army National Guardís participation in recent wars has been greater than most people would have predicted. At one point in 2005, Army National Guard brigades made up more than half of the United Statesí combat brigades in Iraq ó the Army Guardís largest combat role since World War II, according to the Guardís website. It also plays a key role in homeland security and disaster relief.
The Air National Guard has also plays a pivotal role in protecting the nation, providing the majority of the aircraft that responded to the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001; flying more than 4,000 airlift sorties in relief efforts after hurricanes Katrina, Wilma and Rita.
So why would someone shoot at a group of National Guard members enjoying their breakfast? Early reports suggest it was an aberration for shooter Eduardo Sencion and for the National Guard ó another fatal mix of mental instability and high-powered weaponry. Thatís a tragic way for anyone to die.

Comments

Comments closed.

Crime

Blotter: July 29

Local

Downtown residents, business owners say noisy construction is A-OK, sign of progress to come

Business

County unemployment rises in June, positive job growth seen in leisure and hospitality sector

Local

NC poet laureate will speak during historical marker celebration, talks about life, race

Local

Spencer moves back public hearing on longer, staggered terms

Education

High school fire academy lets seniors jump start a service career

News

Country Club of Salisbury unveils renovated clubhouse, plots additional upgrades

David Freeze

David Freeze: Biggest adventure day coming next

Local

South Ellis Street in for improvements because of $100,000 grant for BlockWork

Local

Little League softball: Rowan drops regional final, but moves on

Education

Catawba students, grads make it out to the ballpark for summer of baseball

Education

Education briefs: RSS Teacher of the Year gets Phillip J. Kirk Scholarship

News

North Carolina requiring state health workers to get vaccine

Nation/World

Infrastructure deal: Senate suddenly acts to take up bill

News

State briefs: North Carolina woman charged after 4-year-old shoots himself

Coronavirus

Rowan County among communities where CDC recommends masks indoors

Crime

Blotter: Shooters mistakenly fire bullets into woman’s West Kerr Street house

Local

Light installation could delay Bell Tower Green opening, but formal event still set for Sept. 10

Kannapolis

Kannapolis restroom listed among top 10 in the country, vying for top spot

Business

Mixed-use development planned near Atrium Health Ballpark

Local

Little League softball: Rowan plays for regional championship, qualifies for World Series

Nation/World

CDC changes course on indoor masks in some parts of the US

Nation/World

Racism of rioters takes center stage in Jan. 6 hearing

News

State briefs: Woman accused of taking baby to break-in