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Letters to the editor – Monday

Mt. Ulla tower fight wasting tax dollars
Many folks who live in Rowan County may think the broadcast tower fiasco in Mt. Ulla does not affect them.
I would like to point out that the taxpayers of Rowan County have paid out $120,214.26 as of July 27, 2011. Taxpayers will also be forced to foot the bill for bringing in an attorney from Charlotte for the Aug. 1 hearing.
The commissioners had a legal standing to deny the latest conditional use permit at the July 5 meeting. Commissioners Sides, Ford, Mitchell and Coltrain voted to deny the motion to dismiss the permit. Commissioner Sides didn’t consider it for a moment and immediately made a motion to dismiss our claim. Our claim was that this issue has already been heard, decided on and backed up all the way to the N.C. Supreme Court. Commissioner Ford, a broadcaster, was quick to second the motion.
It is puzzling that Mr. Sides, who continually votes against county funding and incentives to bring new companies and jobs to Rowan County and claims to be the one looking out for the taxpayer, did not hesitate for a second to spend so much of the county’s money to hear this case again. Davidson Broadcasting is not a Rowan County company. This tower will not provide any additional jobs nor any benefit to the citizens of Rowan. I urge our commissioners to vote to deny this permit and quit wasting our precious tax dollars. Wasting over $120,000 is a “bad deal” for county taxpayers. I’m sure our school system or volunteer fire departments would have been able to put that kind of money to good use.
— April Sherrill
Mount Ulla
Entitlement costs can be reduced
David Post’s July 28 column concerning the budget should leave many wondering, is this country really broke? If you accept the figures in this article, $2.166 trillion total federal income and $3.8 trillion total expenditures to be true, then we are in trouble as a nation.
These figures are not written in stone and can be changed. To accept these figures narrows the debate and has a limiting effect; in other words someone has set the parameters for our thinking, and we should step outside the box. For example, take a more detailed look at just one major contributor to our debt, entitlements. They alone account for $2.285 trillion, and much of this is unfunded, in other words, borrowed. However benevolent you may feel our elected leaders in Washington have been, the question has to be asked, have they spent your taxes and borrowed money on a fiscally sound basis? If you are retired, as I am, disabled, on food stamps, or receive any assistance, you answer is likely to be, well they have done the best they could under the circumstances. I would most certainly have to make changes in my spending if Social Security did not send me a check, but many who depend entirely on Social Security for their subsistence would be devastated. What we know is that waste, fraud and poor judgment by politicians and bureaucrats have landed this nation on the brink of financial disaster.
You ask for a plan, the plan should be TEA, taxed enough already, less spending accomplished by a balanced budget and honor the Constitution as written by our forefathers. I know this sounds very simplistic and unrealistic but to continue to borrow almost 50 cents of every dollar spent is not very realistic as well. If government spending is not materially change and soon devastation will surely visit all of us.
— Richard Roberts
Kannapolis
Ryan plan wasn’t an empty ‘platitude’
I recently read an editorial condemning the cut, cap and balance bill that the U.S. Republicans passed. The column listed several reasons why this bill can’t work, and a reader even wrote in to praise the editorial as a voice of reason against “political rhetoric.” The editorial ended with: “If you have a plan rather than a platitude, please tell Washington.”
Um … we have. Actually, many were spelled out in Rep. Paul Ryan’s plan.
The problem with our establishment is that, until now, there was no difference in the Republican and Democratic parties. Both worked together to protect their rich friends and lobbyists. We were stuck with a one-party system. Now the Republicans are returning to their roots, shamed into it by the newly-elected tea party representatives.
The editorial mentioned “The public doesn’t want cuts in Social Security and Medicare,” and that congressmen who vote for them “are likely to lose their jobs.” But guess what? The new tea party freshmen couldn’t care less about re-election. They’re not career politicians. Personally, I like that.
Cut, cap and balance isn’t just fiscally responsible, it’s imperative. Take Social Security and Medicare, for instance; they’re broke. One way to save them might be to consider them insurance policies, not entitlements. We could significantly reduce (or eliminate) the benefits that millionaires, billionaires, fat-pensioned bureaucrats and others receive. I think that they should only get federal assistance if they lose their fortune. This one action would guarantee results by not allowing the wealthiest Americans to have the money to start with (as opposed to raising taxes, which equals overseas tax shelters).
This (Ryan plan) idea won’t kill granny; but it could save her. I think that we should at least talk about these possibilities rather than simply ignoring them, but maybe I’m just platitudinous and unreasonable.
— Steve Pender
Rockwell
Treme exemplifies
Christian gentleman
The phrase “Christian gentleman” gets thrown around a lot these days, but it truly applies to Salisbury’s retiring city manager. David Treme has not only done great things for Salisbury, but he is also just a great guy. Our best to him and to his family as they begin this new phase of their life. Our best to the residents of Salisbury as they adjust to life without his outstanding leadership.
— Steve & Brenda Bouser
Southern Pines
Steve Bouser is a former editor of the Salisbury Post.
A prescription for personal integrity
In today’s society we so often do not take responsibility for the mistakes that we have made. So many times we play the blame game and avoid ownership of the things that we do wrong. Even our own government enables us to blame our problems on others and create “scapegoats.” I guess this is why it is so refreshing for someone to admit an error and accept responsibility for a mistake. I had a local pharmacy do this today. The error was on a prescription for my son. Instead of sweeping it under the rug or pointing the finger at the doctor’s office, this pharmacist took the time to call me, admit the mistake and gave me a genuine apology. Because of her “owning the mistake,” I have so much respect for her and the company for which she works, and I just want to say thank you for that act of integrity. Everyone makes mistakes. The difference in our integrity is how we react to them.
— Talitha Lowman
Salisbury
Late-night drivers endanger pedestrians
I have a complaint about those drivers out on the major roads at night and during the early morning hours in the city of Salisbury.
For about the third time since moving back to Salisbury from Lexington in April 2010, I was almost run over. People on Innes Street, Jake Alexander Boulevard and Statesville Boulevard seem to be going faster and faster in their vehicles. About 99 percent of the time, I cross the street at a stop light and am very careful. It’s just those partygoers who must be high on drugs or alcohol that have it in for an innocent pedestrian like myself.
Please, Salisbury police, can you park your cars during the night and early morning hours at places where you can use radar guns? There are a lot of young people out there who drive hazardously and need to be checked out.
— Michael Kondek
Salisbury
Company’s donation deserves a salute
I would like to thank FillTech USA of Rockwell for contacting me to pick up another large donation of items needed by the military. This local company takes pride in its work and has dedicated employees. The company’s unselfishness is gratifying in these difficult economic times, and its willingness to support the military is very admirable.
Founded in 1995, FillTech USA quickly became recognized for its quality of workmanship. The company has 40 workers on a two-shift operation and top management. I have delivered the donation to the local Army Reserves, Air National Guard, Marine Project Devil Dog and Soldier’s Angels. FillTech USA is a good steward of supporting the community and the military.
I am very thankful for them and their support.
— Rodney Cress
Salisbury

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