• 50°

Letters to the editor – Friday (7-15011)

Mt. Ulla broadcast tower just keeps coming back
“Greed is good … greed works …”
Those are the infamous words of Gordon Gekko from the movie “Wall Street.” Greed is never good but Mr. Gekko got it partially right; greed does work. The struggling masses witness this daily; we watched it create the Great Recession as the tax-paying masses bailed out the businesses that assisted it. It continues to work with the proposed broadcast tower in Mt. Ulla. After being denied by various boards and courts for nearly a decade, it has come full circle back to the Rowan County Board of Commissioners.
This Mt. Ulla location was proposed in 2003 and denied by Rowan’s commission in 2005; it was denied again by Rowan’s Zoning Board of Adjusters in 2010; it was denied by Superior Court in 2006, the N.C. Court of Appeals in 2007 and the Supreme Court in 2008. The broadcast company even tried Mooresville but was denied by Iredell’s Board of Adjustors in 2004 and the Mooresville Commission.
All of these courts and boards came to the same consensus repeatedly; so why the do-overs year after year?
Because greed is relentless; it is tireless, and if it doesn’t get the answer it wants, no matter how high the court, it keeps cycling back again, year after year like an entitled child, until it does.
If this tower is finally passed, my personal fear is that a plane will hit this monster or a tornado turn it into a murderous projectile. Planes have hit towers, and towers have fallen. Accidents happen … just ask the insurance companies who bank on them. If a tragedy should happen, I hope every individual who helped in finally getting it passed be held accountable.
Yes, greed does work but it is never “good.” Gordon Gekko was the villain, not the hero.
— Adele Goodman
Mooresville (Rowan County)
A fairy tale about taxes
I know a man who grows pecan trees. He planted them, watered them, fertilized them, pruned them and spayed to keep them healthy. The trees grew, and when they began to produce a crop of pecans, he sold the fruits of his labor. He made a lot of money and prospered with the sale of his pecans. His taxes were great and he along with others who prospered in a similar fashion had to pay a third of all the taxes collected in that kingdom by the king and his court.
One day the king saw and envied this man’s prosperity, and he along with the king’s court decided to tax him more, even though his tax was great but still not enough to satisfy the king’s needs. You see, because of wars and years of spending more than the treasury could afford, the kingdom was broke. Many were unable to find work. Workers were laid off, businesses closed and taxes collected were dwindling. Yet the king and his court refused to stop their unwarranted spending. So, the king said to the people, these pecan growers have too many pecans, and we believe we should tax these fat cats even more; they, too, should pay their fair share. To which the pecan growers said to the king, “How much is enough? How much is our fair share?” Is it not enough that we already pay over one third all of the taxes collected, and as a group we only represent 1 percent of the taxpayers in the kingdom? How is it fair that 1 percent of the tax payers should pay over a third of all the taxes?
Do you think it is really wise to wound or maybe even kill the goose laying the golden eggs?
— Richard Roberts
Kannapolis

Comments

Comments closed.

Crime

Thomasville officer hospitalized after chase that started in Rowan County

Local

Board of elections discusses upgrading voting machines, making precinct changes

News

Lawmakers finalize how state will spend COVID-19 funds

Local

Salisbury Station one of several ‘hot spots’ included in NCDOT rail safety study

Education

Essie Mae Kiser Foxx appeal denied, school considering options

News

Iredell County votes to move Confederate memorial to cemetery

Nation/World

Lara Trump may have eyes on running for a Senate seat

Local

Rowan among counties in Biden’s disaster declaration from November floods

Local

PETA plans protest at Salisbury Police Department on Friday

Education

Essie Mae Kiser Foxx appeal denied, charter revoked

Coronavirus

29 new positives, no new COVID-19 deaths reported

Crime

Blotter: Woman charged with drug crimes

News

Nesting no more: Eagles appear to have moved on from Duke’s Buck Station

Business

The Smoke Pit leaving downtown Salisbury for standalone building on Faith Road

Education

Shoutouts

High School

High school football: Hornets’ Gaither set the tone against West

Local

Salisbury to show off new fire station

Education

Livingstone College to host virtual Big Read events this month

Local

City makes some appointments to local boards, holds off on others to seek women, appointees of color

Education

Education briefs: RCCC instructor honored by Occupational Therapy Association

Local

Second quarter financial update shows promising outlook for city’s budget

Columnists

Genia Woods: Let’s talk about good news in Salisbury

Local

City attorney will gather more information for Salisbury nondiscrimination ordinance

Education

North Hills planning to hold May fundraiser in person