• 46°

Cal Thomas: Some real reason for hope

Robert Woodson would probably wince if you called him a ěcommunity organizer.î Thatís because for the last 30 years as president of the Center for Neighborhood Enterprise, he has not spent time organizing the poor around ineffective government programs and other addictions he has been helping them become self-sufficient.
ěYou canít learn anything by studying failure,î he says. ěIf you want to learn anything, you must study the successful.î
I spent last Tuesday riding around Washington and Waldorf, Md., visiting housing projects Woodsonís organization supports and studying his success. I met former drug addicts, dealers, prostitutes and pimps ó all of whom testify to having been through failed government programs ó who now say they are clean, sober and off the streets.
The keys are discipline, raised expectations, a family atmosphere infused with tough love, imposed morality and yes, hope.
Cost estimates for the ěwar on povertyî vary, but most put it in the trillions of dollars. That war hasnít been won. Record numbers are on food stamps.
Woodson says the difference between programs he supports and others is that he ětakes time-tested principles and virtues and applies them to addictions, homelessness and other conditions. We have moral consistency.î
Woodson quotes popular Christian minister Chuck Swindoll: ěLife is 10 percent what happens to us and 90 percent how we respond to it.î Woodson, who is African-American, as were all of those I met, tells me ěEvery black community going back to 1784 had welfare based on morals.î The last 40 years, he says, have transformed the way we look at poverty: ěUntil 1965, 80 percent of black families had two parents in the home. The í60s destroyed all that.î
When most people think of ěcivil rights leadersî they think of Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton and the NAACP. Woodson has no time for them. He says, ěThey get publicity; we get results.î
ěEighty percent of all anti-poverty money doesnít go to poor people,î Woodson says, ěbut to organizations that claim to serve poor people.î He is emphatic about what he says and he produces success when so many other programs fail: ěFaith in God transforms the inside and that faith transforms the outside.î
Pastor Shirley Holloway is a no-nonsense, African-American woman who heads Kingdom Village in Waldorf. It provides housing and, more importantly, a home environment for many who have not had a place to live ó other than prison in some cases ó in years. She also runs House of Help/City of Hope in a formerly tough (until she took over) neighborhood in Southeast Washington. Holloway tells me that she and Woodson ěare not visible because we donít whine and complain.î
Woodson reminds me of an often-ignored fact: ěPoor whites in Appalachia are worse off than inner-city blacks.î Perhaps that is because not as many government programs are available to them and the media and politicians mostly ignore poor whites.
There is a lesson here for Republicans if they will stop forfeiting the compassion game to Democrats. Woodson and Holloway are employing conservative Republican values and ideas, which are succeeding. Why are corporations and wealthy individuals donating so much money to people and programs that arenít working? Why do so many corporations contribute to Sharpton and Jackson when their track record of transforming people from dependency to self-sufficiency is, to be charitable, somewhat lacking.
Republicans could win over the votes of many of the poor who think their future lies with Democrats. It doesnít, not if Democrats continue to spend money on failed programs that have no power to change lives. This will require Republicans getting out of their comfort zones and hanging out with people who not only have found hope, but who can communicate hope to others.
As Jesse Jackson might put it: ěKeep hope alive!î For Woodson and Holloway, thatís more than an applause line.

Cal Thomas writes columns for Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, N.Y. 14207. Email him at tmseditors@tribune.com.

Comments

Comments closed.

Ask Us

Ask Us: How can homebound seniors be vaccinated?

Local

Political Notebook: Interim health director to talk COVID-19 at county Democrats breakfast

Local

‘Their names liveth forevermore:’ Officials dedicate Fire Station No. 6 to fallen firefighters Monroe, Isler

Crime

Blotter: Salisbury man charged for breaking into Salisbury high, getting juvenile to help

Nation/World

With virus aid in sight, Democrats debate filibuster changes

Local

City officials differ on how, what information should be released regarding viral K-9 officer video

High School

High school basketball: Carson girls are 3A champions

Lifestyle

High school, college sweethearts marry nearly 50 years later

Local

With jury trials set to resume, impact of COVID-19 on process looms

Legion baseball

Book explores life of Pfeiffer baseball coach Joe Ferebee

Education

Rowan-Salisbury Board of Education to receive update on competency-based education

Business

Biz Roundup: Kannapolis expects to see economic, housing growth continue in 2021

Business

A fixture of downtown Salisbury’s shopping scene, Caniche celebrates 15th anniversary this month

Local

Slate of new officers during local GOP convention; Rev. Jenkins becomes new chair

Landis

Landis officials narrow search for new manager to five candidates; expect decision within a month

Lifestyle

Together at last: High school, college sweethearts marry nearly 50 years later

Education

Rowan-Salisbury Schools sorts out transportation logistics in preparation for full-time return to classes

High School

Photo gallery: Carson goes undefeated, wins 3A state championship

Nation/World

Europe staggers as infectious variants power virus surge

Nation/World

Biden, Democrats prevail as Senate OKs $1.9 trillion virus relief bill

Nation/World

Senate Democrats strike deal on jobless aid, move relief bill closer to approval

News

Duke Life Flight pilot may have shut down wrong engine in fatal crash

News

Two NC counties get to participate in satellite internet pilot for students

Local

PETA protesters gather in front of police department