• 41°

Letters to the editor – Thursday (3-10-2011)

Group critical of Muslims is trying to stir up trouble
Regarding Steve Penderís March 6 letter warning of the spread of ěshariaî law:
As a Muslim, I find it disturbing that people like Nebeel Qureshi, David Wood and their ilk have such a following. Allow me to shed some light on these people.
Iíve never spoken with Nebeel, but I have debated extensively with David Wood, a philosophy grad and former atheist. They travel to Arab festivals and Muslim events, always making a scene for the cameras. On this note, I wonder how a group of Muslims passing out Qurans and ministering at, say, an event like Godstock would fare? We have a right to be where we want to be. But is it the right thing or the American thing to do?
Nebeelís and Davidís group, Acts 17, has a history of manipulation and fabrication. In their highly edited video ěSharia Law Arabfest 2009,î this is all too true. Acts 17 subsequently released a new, unedited video in which they defile themselves and disprove all they were claiming in the first video.
Nebeel, David and the others were arrested for infringing on the rights of others. Just as Muslims would be for causing conflicts at a Christian festival or Nazis who attended a Jewish festival.
The only anti-American behavior at the festival was that of Nebeel, David and their minions. Without their fear-mongering, they would have no followers, and fear of the establishment of sharia law in the U.S.A. is but another tool they use.
Mr. Pender also needs to realize that James Clapperís and Jimmy Carterís assessment of the Muslim Brotherhood is based on facts and firsthand knowledge, not a biased opinion. To belittle one of our greatest presidents, FDR, as ěridiculousî shows where heís coming from.
Mr. Pender stated what courage it takes to convert from Islam to Christianity. I say it takes more in this country to convert from Christianity to Islam, as I did.
ó Leland DeMent
Salisbury
Readers wanting more information about Acts 17 can visit the groupís website, www.acts17.net.
About those Badin PCBs …
Youíd think Dennis Lemly (My Turn, March 7), a professor, would know better than to believe everything he hears. Dean Naujoks, the Yadkin Riverkeeper, has run his accusations blaming Alcoa for Badin Lake’s PCB pollution into the ground. In the Hearing Officerís Report for Alcoaís 401 Water Quality Certificate, issued in May 2009, the stateís Division of Water Quality stated ě… staff of the Division of Waste Management have reviewed the fish tissue data and information on PCB content of materials used by Alcoa and concluded that it is not possible to establish a link between Alcoa operations and the PCBs in fish tissue (memo from Rob McDaniel to Dexter Matthews, Director of the Division of Waste Management dated February 25, 2009). Although PCB types used at the Alcoa plant were found in the fish tissue samples, the samples also indicated the presence of many PCB types not found in materials used at Alcoa. Therefore, it appears that the presence of PCBs in the fish tissue is a watershed-based issue.
ěDWQ has carefully reviewed the recent fish tissue study done by DHHS as well as a follow-up examination of these data by the Hazardous Waste Section of the DWM which concluded that these PCBs could not be ëfingerprintedí back to the Alcoa site.î
Dean Naujoks knows this. And yet he’s continued to make this false accusation over and over again. He may be the one whoís liable ó for libel!
ó Ann Brownlee
Salisbury

Comments

Comments closed.

Local

City approves DOT agreement, Salisbury Station project could begin next year

Local

County plans to use vulture effigy, enforce violations to remedy animal carcass feeding problem

Education

Two weeks after ending enhanced protocols, Catawba has no COVID-19 cases

News

Council to hear revised version of Downtown Main Street Plan

News

Political Notebook: Majority of likely voters, local legislators support school reopening bill

Coronavirus

COVID-19 vaccinations in Rowan top positives since start of pandemic

Crime

Man faces drug charges after breaking and entering call

Lifestyle

Waterworks schedules 2021 Summer ARTventures

Crime

Blotter: Man faces drug charges after being found passed out in vehicle

Ask Us

Ask Us: What programs exist for litter cleanup?

Business

County begins accepting restaurant grant applications

Crime

Blotter: Salisbury man charged with nine more felony sex offenses

Nation/World

Biden team readies wider economic package after virus relief

Nation/World

Spacewalking astronauts prep station for new solar wings

Nation/World

Cuomo sorry for remarks aide ‘misinterpreted’ as harassment

Nation/World

Trump calls for GOP unity, repeats lies about election loss

Education

Rowan County administers 700 vaccines, with majority going to local educators

Crime

Shoplifting at Walmart presents challenge for Salisbury police

Local

Commissioners will hear details about changes to solar energy policies

Business

After overcoming obstacles, local barber Daniel King earns registered status

Lifestyle

39th annual K12 student exhibitions go virtual

Business

Biz Roundup: Chamber of Commerce to host ‘Salute to Agri-Business’ at March Power in Partnership

Local

Local legislators back bills ranging from new restrictions on sex offenders to Holocaust education

News

After surviving COVID-19 scare, Lois Willard set to celebrate 100th birthday