• 36°

College Football: Tressel in trouble

By Rusty Miller
Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio ó Ohio State suspended football coach Jim Tressel for two games and fined him $250,000 on Tuesday for violating NCAA rules by failing to notify the school about information he received involving two players and questionable activities involving the sale of memorabilia.
Tressel also will receive a public reprimand and must make a public apology. The NCAA is investigating and could reject the self-imposed penalties and impose additional sanctions.
Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith said he never seriously considered firing Tressel for violating his contract, which specifies that he must immediately report any ó the word is underlined in the contract ó information which pertains to violations of NCAA, Big Ten or Ohio State bylaws and rules.
ěWherever we end up, Jim Tressel is our football coach,î Smith said. ěHe is our coach, and we trust him implicitly.î
Last December, the NCAA suspended quarterback Terrelle Pryor and four teammates for the first five games on the 2011 season for selling jerseys, championship rings and trophies to a local tattoo parlor owner. The suspensions came just 16 days after the U.S. attorney told the school of a federal investigation that included players.
The school did not learn until January, however, that Tressel had been tipped off to the federal investigation back in April.
ěObviously Iím disappointed that this happened at all,î Tressel said. ěI take my responsibility for what we do at Ohio State tremendously seriously and for the game of football. I plan to grow from this. Iím sincerely saddened by the fact that I let some people down and didnít do things as well as I possibly could have.î
Yahoo! Sports first reported Tresselís prior knowledge of the possible improper benefits on Monday.
Tressel said he allowed the two players cited in the e-mail to play the entire 2010 season because he did not want to ěinterfere with a federal investigationî and worried that sitting eligible players would raise a ěwhole new set of questions.î
Tressel received an e-mail on April 2, 2010. A person Tressel identified only as ěa lawyer,î mentioned that Ohio State players had been implicated in activities with Eddie Rife, a local tattoo-parlor owner. The e-mail, according to Tressel, said players were selling signed Buckeyes memorabilia and giving it to Rife in exchange for money and tattoos. The e-mail said Rife had a criminal record and had witnessed one of his friends being murdered in a parking lot.
The Buckeyes coach said he kept quiet out fear for the safety of the two players connected to the federal, criminal drug-trafficking case. That investigation prompted an Ohio State and NCAA investigation involving players selling memorabilia and getting discounted tattoos.
ěI have had a player murdered. Iíve had a player incarcerated. Iíve had a player get taken into the drug culture and lose his opportunity for a productive life,î an emotional Tressel said, tears welling in his eyes, at a news conference on Tuesday night. ěIt was obviously tremendously concerning. Quite honestly, I was scared.î

Comments

Comments closed.

Coronavirus

State to vaccinate medically vulnerable starting March 24

Coronavirus

One new death, 20 new COVID-19 positives reported in Rowan

Kannapolis

Kannapolis man dies in moped crash

Crime

Salisbury Police chief addresses K-9 video, says officer separated from animal

Local

Rowan Rescue Squad sets record straight on fundraising typo

Local

City approves DOT agreement, Salisbury Station project could begin next year

Local

County plans to use vulture effigy, enforce violations to remedy animal carcass feeding problem

Education

Two weeks after ending enhanced protocols, Catawba has no COVID-19 cases

News

Council to hear revised version of Downtown Main Street Plan

Local

Veto override of NC school reopening bill fails in Senate

News

Political Notebook: Majority of likely voters, local legislators support school reopening bill

Coronavirus

COVID-19 vaccinations in Rowan top positives since start of pandemic

Crime

Man faces drug charges after breaking and entering call

Lifestyle

Waterworks schedules 2021 Summer ARTventures

Crime

Blotter: Man faces drug charges after being found passed out in vehicle

Ask Us

Ask Us: What programs exist for litter cleanup?

Business

County begins accepting restaurant grant applications

Crime

Blotter: Salisbury man charged with nine more felony sex offenses

Nation/World

Biden team readies wider economic package after virus relief

Nation/World

Spacewalking astronauts prep station for new solar wings

Nation/World

Cuomo sorry for remarks aide ‘misinterpreted’ as harassment

Nation/World

Trump calls for GOP unity, repeats lies about election loss

Education

Rowan County administers 700 vaccines, with majority going to local educators

Crime

Shoplifting at Walmart presents challenge for Salisbury police