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Children's Developmental Services offers early intervention

By Rob Quick
For the Salisbury Post
A blessing is the only way to describe the amount of special care provided by the Children’s Developmental Services Agency, according to Erin and Brandon Talbott.
Children’s Developmental Services moved its regional office from Concord to Salisbury two months ago, and the timing couldn’t have been better for the Talbotts.
Operating out of 417 N. Main St., Suite E, in downtown Salisbury, Children’s Developmental Services provides “early intervention” services for young children who demonstrate developmental disabilities. And the services cost nothing or very little.
If a family has health insurance, they may be expected to use that, but ability to pay is not a consideration.
The agency moved its regional office from Concord to Salisbury for more space and to expand its services.The Salisbury office already serves some 2,500 children in Rowan, Cabarrus and Iredell counties. That number has increased steadily, and so far, the agency has been able to serve all children who qualified.
Children up to age 3 can receive service coordination that helps them gain proper developmental care in motor skills, speech, self-help, social/emotional and cognitive skills.
All of this starts with developmental evaluations to see just what is needed.
The Talbotts’ twin boys were born prematurely while they still lived in Florida, and they already were receiving therapy before moving to Salisbury.
When they got here, they were grateful to find a program like Children’s Developmental Services.
At 3 months, Ethan, was diagnosed with torticollis. The Web site eMedicineHealth.com defines torticollis as “one of a broader category of disorders that exhibit flexion, extension or twisting of muscles of the neck beyond their normal position. In torticollis, your neck tends to twist to one side.”Three months after Ethan was diagnosed, the Talbotts noticed his twin, Kane, was not rolling over properly or performing other actions expected of a child his age.
The Talbots contacted their doctor and traveled to many offices for therapy.
When the family moved to North Carolina, the twins were 18 months old.
That’s when Marva McCain, head of Children’s Developmental Services’ Salisbury office, stepped forward.
“In Florida, we didn’t have a service coordinator or in-home therapy like the (Children’s Developmental Services Agency) and Mrs. McCain has offered,” Erin Talbott said.
The agency evaluates children for services they need and then finds a professional to provide the service or provides the service through one of its own staff members.
With gasoline prices at an all-time high, the agency arranges for professionals to go to a child’s home for a variety of services, such as play, occupational, speech and physical therapy.
Ethan receives physical and occupational therapy, and Kane and Ethan receive play and speech therapy. Both children have progressed through the program successfully and are improving daily.
The program serves children who are developmentally delayed or have established conditions. The agency will take referrals from anyone who has noticed signs of late development in a child.
After having the twins, the Talbotts added son, Rylan, who has shown no problems. Then, 10 months ago, Jackson was born prematurely like the twins and very quickly diagnosed with cerebral palsy.
Children’s Developmental Services “was quick to help us with Jackson also by getting the equipment needed to help him walk and stand,” Erin said. “Mrs. McCain even went with me to help set up Social Security when the time came.”
Donna Thomas, habilitation program supervisor, said, “I work with one of the most outstanding teams of people that anyone could ever ask for. Also, if it would not have been for a landlord like John Schofeld, who is allowing us more space than we paid for and who donated many furnishings, we would not have an office as nice as we have.”
For more information on the Children’s Developmental Services, call 704-639-7995. Walk-ins are welcome.
 
 
 

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