• 37°

Burning ban lifted at noon today

RALEIGH ń Recent rains across the state have allowed the N.C. Division
of Forest Resources to lift its ban on open burning across the state.
The ban on open burning, which was put in place statewide on Thursday,
is cancelled effective at noon today. Officials with the Division of
Forest Resources are issuing burning permits again.
Recent rainfall has reduced fire danger. However, residents should be
careful if they decide to burn pine straw, leaves and other yard debris.
During spring fire season, high winds coupled with quickly-drying forest
fuels can create hazardous burning conditions.
State officials could reinstate the ban on open burning if the drought
and increased wildfire activity persists. North Carolina has had an
above average number of wildfires this year. The state has experienced
more than 1,981 fires statewide this year. Those fires have burned
20,453 acres.
People who intend to conduct open burning need to adhere to the
following tips:

* Make sure you have an approved burning permit. You can obtain a burning permit at any Division of Forest Resourcesí office, a county-approved burning permit agent, or online at www.dfr.state.nc.us .
* Check with your county fire marshals office for local laws on burning debris. Some communities allow burning only during specified hours; others forbid it entirely.
* Check the weather. Donít burn if conditions are dry or windy.
* Consider alternatives to burning. Some yard debris such as leaves and grass may be more valuable if composted.
* Only burn natural vegetation from your property. Burning household trash or any other man-made materials is illegal.
* Trash should be hauled away to a convenience center.
* Plan burning for the late afternoon when conditions are typically less windy and more humid.
* If you must burn, be prepared. Use a shovel or hoe to clear a perimeter around the area around you plan to burn.
* Keep fire tools ready. To control the fire, you will need a hose, bucket, a steel rake and a shovel for tossing dirt on the fire.
* Never use flammable liquids such as kerosene, gasoline or diesel fuel to speed burning.
* Stay with your fire until it is completely out. In North Carolina, human carelessness leads to more wildfires than any other cause.

Comments

Comments closed.

News

Nesting no more: Eagles appear to have moved on from Duke’s Buck Station

Business

The Smoke Pit leaving downtown Salisbury for standalone building on Faith Road

Education

Shoutouts

High School

High school football: Hornets’ Gaither set the tone against West

Local

Salisbury to show off new fire station

Education

Livingstone College to host virtual Big Read events this month

Local

City makes some appointments to local boards, holds off on others to seek women, appointees of color

Education

Education briefs: RCCC instructor honored by Occupational Therapy Association

Local

Second quarter financial update shows promising outlook for city’s budget

Columnists

Genia Woods: Let’s talk about good news in Salisbury

Local

City attorney will gather more information for Salisbury nondiscrimination ordinance

Education

North Hills planning to hold May fundraiser in person

East Spencer

Developers aim to transform former Dunbar School site into multi-purpose community development

Education

Knox student organizing event to get community cycling

Education

Decision on Essie Mae charter appeal expected Thursday

Nation/World

House passes sweeping voting rights bill over GOP opposition

Nation/World

Police uncover ‘possible plot’ by militia to breach Capitol

Nation/World

States rapidly expanding vaccine access as supplies surge

News

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper receives COVID-19 vaccine

News

North Carolina health officials urge schools to reopen

Crime

In letter, PETA criticizes Salisbury Police for K-9 video

Coronavirus

Three deaths, 29 new COVID-19 positives reported

Crime

Blotter: Bullet holes found in woman’s Park Avenue apartment

Crime

Man faces assault charges for domestic incident