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A.L. Brown High students win cash for school

Students at A.L. Brown High School won $2,500 in the Big Lots Lots2Give Video Contest.
School officials will get a check at 1 p.m. Friday at the Big Lots store at 407 N. Cannon Blvd.
The video, ‘No Home for New(s) Anchors,’ is described on www.lots2give.com: “News flash … AL Brown students deprived of learning opportunity! High school students in Kannapolis have been robbed for years of the ability to study lucrative careers in Audio/Video Technology and Communications. Job outlook goes up while learning goes down! We need equipment for this new course of study.”
The chorus sings a rap anthem about students missing out on opportunities because of a lack of equipment. You can view the video at http://www.lots2give.com/?s=U73MmkJCqtQ
The 90-second video is a second place prize winner.
Big Lots asked participating schools to submit a short video and brief essay explaining why their school is in need of financial support. From June 11 through July 12, the public voted for their favorite video at the Web site. More than 300,000 votes were cast to determine the 26 winners who will share $80,000 in cash prizes, including a $10,000 grand prize, three $5,000 first prizes, and 22 $2,500 second prizes.
John E. Ewing Middle School in Gaffney, S.C., won the $10,000 grand prize.
In addition to the video contest, Big Lots established an in-store donation program to help the schools participating in the Lots2Give program. From May 2 through July 12, Big Lots customers were invited to make $1 or $5 donations at participating stores.
A.L. Brown High School will receive $273.67 from their share of the donations collected throughout the Charlotte area. Kannapolis Middle School and Kannapolis Intermediate School will also receive $273.67 each.
On Saturday, Big Lots stores across the country will salute the efforts of educators by hosting an in-store Teacher Appreciation Day event. All educators with a valid school identification card will receive 10 percent off their total purchase.
“Big Lots is committed to programs that support education, and with Lots2Give, we had the opportunity to help bridge the funding gap many schools face,” said Big Lots Chairman and CEO Steve Fishman. “We invited our customers to support an important cause, and they have been especially generous knowing that 100 percent of the funds raised through the in-store donation program go directly to participating schools.”

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