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Letters to the editor – Thursday (11-19-09)

Fort Hood and the dangers of political correctness
The Fort Hood massacre was long in coming. In fact, Americans should not be surprised at the chain of events that offered a jihadist the opportunity to murder so many soldiers. This is not the first time that a military officer has killed his companions. Last time, the murderer was Asian and little was said. This time the alleged assassin was of Middle Eastern origin.
The evidence indicates that Major Hassan, a psychiatrist, had been under investigation for many months because of his expressed misconduct. Despite information that he professed views hostile to democracy, his investigation ran into the wall of political correctness whereby he could have alleged prejudice. His presentation at Walter Reed Hospital only evoked dismay when he spoke against Muslim soldiers being sent to Muslim countries. Why?
Today, this nation is infected by the perniciousness of being politically correct. Such a hoarish concept has justified our disregard for the law and adversely affected the First Amendment right of free speech. While sticks and stones may break my bones, one can always walk away from another using words not to his liking. We now fear expressing some opinion or performing any function whereby we can be accused of investigating someone who is not a typical “American.”
As a result, the law no longer offers an even playing field. One only need accuse another of making statements not to his liking ó such as a speech at a college campus ó and the speaker is assaulted for being insensitive and prejudiced. Nowhere are we legally required to submit, physically or intellectually, or to subvert the system through fear or inaction. Intelligence agencies should not be blamed for failing to pursue an investigation of Hassan; even our politicians are infected by the odor of political correctness.
ó Arthur Steinberg
Salisbury
A wonderful service
If you were not one of the 279 people who attended Rowan Helping Ministries’ first Thanksgiving service on Nov. 15 at Catawba College, you missed a wonderful celebration of Thanksgiving for our community sponsored by RHM.
RHM is an organization that helps those in need in so many ways. It makes it easy for those who wish to donate financially or give their time as a volunteer and know their support is directly given to those who need it. Those who give and those who receive came together for a beautiful Thanksgiving service on Sunday.
Special thanks to the musicians and choirs who made it a wonderful afternoon. Special thanks to Gail Kimball and her committee for the planning the first annual service.
Rowan Helping Ministries is a blessing to our entire community, and all those involved help to “put God’s love into action” every day of the year. It makes Salisbury/Rowan a better place to live.
ó Judy Banish
Salisbury
Banish chairs the RHM Board of Directors.

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