• 57°

Cooler weather has deer on the move

Cooler fall weather, diminished acorns and the fall rut have deer on the move throughout the area. Local hunters are geared up and ready to break out their guns for the central season, which includes Rowan, Davidson, Cabarrus and Stanly counties.
Opening day is Saturday, Nov. 14, 30 minutes before sunrise. The gun deer season closes statewide 30 minutes after sunset on Jan. 1.
Archery hunters have had a successful season, with several hunters bagging trophy class deer in our area. A quick look at the bragging board at Hill’s Minnow Farm, a sporting goods store in eastern Rowan county, will confirm a successful start of the season for many hunters.
Muzzle-loading firearm season begins Nov. 7, in the central deer season. Hunters who normally don’t take part in archery season can take advantage of this “primitive” firearm season. Lasting a week and ending 30 minutes after sunset on Friday, Nov. 13, this short season usually accounts for some true trophy bucks.
Hunters are reminded that the extra “doe tags” that were available last year at no cost, are again available this year but are no longer free. The cost is $10 per two tags.
Safety tips
Wear a blaze orange hat or vest. This is required for hunting big game with any weapon from Nov. 7 until the close of deer season.
– Use a safety harness when hunting from an elevated tree stand. Secure the harness to an anchor point as you climb into the stand.
– Always consider what is beyond your intended target.
– Check stands for rusty parts, rotten straps or wood, and insects or critters that may have moved in during the offseason.
– Hunt with a buddy. Always leave a note or let a family member or friend know where you plan to hunt and your estimated time of return.
– Have a range day before opening day and fire your guns to ensure function and accuracy.
Q&A
Q: If a non-hunter accompanies me to my stand and does nothing other than watch or take pictures, is a hunting license required for this person?
A: No license is required for a person to observe a hunting or fishing activity. However, once the observer participates in the hunt, such as dragging deer, using calls, handling leashed hunting dogs or other such activity, then licenses are required.
Q: My uncle has give me permission to hunt his property. Do I need a license since it is “family” land?
A: A license is required. The landowner exemption is: a landowner, spouse and dependent children up to age 18 are exempt from hunting license requirements. However, a free harvest report card is required to harvest big game.
Q: If I take my 12-year-old child hunting and she harvests a deer, do I validate my harvest report card for her deer?
A: No, children under the age of 16 may obtain a free harvest report card from any Wildlife Service Agent. (or place that sells hunting/fishing licenses).
Q: If I have no guns or archery equipment in my vehicle, can I go at night and shine my headlights or a spotlight to look at deer?
A: No, it is illegal in Rowan and most surrounding counties to shine a light in search of deer.
Hunter education classes
Rowan County: Dec. 4-5, start time is 6 p.m. on Dec. 4. The class will be at Rowan County Rescue Squad, 1140 Julian Road.
Cabarrus County: Dec. 7-9 Start time 6 p.m. each of three evenings. The class will be at Bass Pro Shop Outdoor World, 8181 Concord Mills Blvd.
For quick registration, go to www.ncwildlife.org site and click hunter education.
Disabled sportsmen hunt
The N. C. Wildlife Resources Commission is lauding the success of a recent disabled sportsman hunt at the R. Wayne Bailey-Caswell Game Land. Five disabled sportsmen and their hunting companions harvested eight deer, six does and two bucks. The hunters used specially designed permanent blinds overlooking food plots of forage turnips, crimson clover and annual rye.
“All of the hunters saw deer and turkey, and one group reported seeing coyotes,” said Jason Allen, a wildlife management technician. “All parties involved seemed to have a good time.”
The successful hunt was due in part to donations from local businesses and organizations:
Oakview Grocery in Yanceyville donated ice, Bojangles of Yanceyville donated a portion of the meals and the N.C. Handicapped Sportsmen paid the remainder of the costs.
Managing native grasses
The 2009 Fisheries and Wildlife Seminar series on Nov. 18 at the Centennial Campus Center for Wildlife Education will examine considerations and techniques for managing native grasses and the associated plant community for wildlife habitat and livestock forage.
The presenter, Dr. Craig Harper, is a professor at the University of Tennessee and an expert on the management of native warm-season grasses in the Mid-South.
The seminar series is a partnership between faculty and students in the Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences Program at N.C. State University and N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission biologists, managers and educators.
A networking session with free refreshments begins at 3:30 p.m. and the public presentation starts at 4 p.m. For a complimentary parking pass, provide your name and mailing address at least one week prior to the seminar by calling 919-707-0203 or e-mailing centennialcenter@ncwildlife.org.
The Centennial Campus Center for Wildlife Education is a free visitor and learning facility of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. Located at 1751 Varsity Drive, Raleigh, on the Centennial Campus of N.C. State University, interactive exhibits highlight Piedmont wildlife species and habitats.
n n nE-mail Sgt. Anthony Sharum of the N.C. Wildlife Resources at huntfishguy66@aol.com.

Comments

Comments closed.

Local

City fights invasive beetles by injecting trees with insecticide

Local

City names downtown recipients for federal Parks Service grant

China Grove

China Grove Town Council weighs 2021-22 budget priorities, supports buying body cameras

Education

Educators reflect on Teacher Appreciation Week

Education

Livingstone College wins $30,000 Home Depot grant

Education

Shoutouts

News

Shield-A-Badge With Prayer program enters 26th year, accepting volunteers to pair with officers

Education

COVID-19 infection, quarantine numbers in Rowan-Salisbury Schools reach new highs

High School

High school football: Offensive line came together for Hornets, who play for state title tonight

Local

Pro baseball: White makes pro debut and says, ‘It felt amazing to be out there’

Education

West Rowan Middle eighth grader wins investment writing contest

Local

YSUP Rowan invites agencies to participate in youth-focused training

Nation/World

US backs waiving intellectual property rules on vaccines

News

As demand drops, Cooper visits vaccine clinic to urge usage

News

NC lawmakers advance bill barring mandatory COVID-19 shots

News

N.C. bill banning Down syndrome abortions nears floor vote

Coronavirus

Rowan County sees 301st death from COVID-19

Coronavirus

N.C. lawmakers advance bill barring mandatory COVID-19 shots

Local

Rowan Public Library joins initiative to help people with digital connectivity

Local

Mocksville to dissolve police department

Crime

Blotter: May 5

Local

Salisbury’s McElroy named top city, county communications professional in state

Local

Locals condemn use of force during 2019 traffic stop of Georgia woman

Kannapolis

Back and better than ever: Cannon Ballers kick off inaugural season in Atrium Health Ballpark