• 52°

Letters to the editor – Monday (10-26-09)

Don’t penalize West’s hard workIt is a sad thing when one works hard at building something over a period of time only to see it taken away by those who have no appreciation for the time and effort put into it. This is the situation facing West Rowan High in the school board’s proposed redistricting plans.
What is being touted as an attempt to meet future growth in western Rowan is, in reality a political agenda aimed at “leveling the playing field” by weakening programs at West High. I am not merely referring to the football program. West has achieved excellence in many areas and has one of the highest, if not the highest graduation rates in the county. Much of what West has achieved, football and otherwise, has not come with any special help, but rather with hard work by dedicated educators and staff over the years. My suggestion is that this is lost on our school board. They are politicians, not educators. What is saddening and even pathetic is that someone feels that politics has to be resorted to to compensate for the lack of achievement on and off the athletic field. While sympathetic to the problems of the North school district, the attempt to redraw boundary lines strikes me as a bandage solution. It seems easier for the school board to change everybody else for the price of $40,000 rather than deal with the root causes of the district’s problems. Perhaps we as taxpayers should question a serious misappropriation of funds, especially in a time when many teachers have lost jobs or are having their hours cut back.
West High will be hurt by this effort. Whether your children attend West or not, I urge you to attend the Nov. 2 and 9 hearings and voice your opposition. It is unfair, divisive and dishonest.
ó W. Chris Townsend
Salisbury
Redistricting is nothing but troubleFor as long as I can remember, West Rowan High School has been in my life. My brother went there, and as a little girl I dreamed of going there, too. I wished for my own Falcon experience. That wish came true last year.
Starting out as a freshman, you would think it was hard, but it wasn’t. I had amazing teachers and friends to help guide me through, but most importantly I had my own marching band family that I was very close to. I love them very much, but of course, with everything that is amazing, something happens, and it all crashes down. I found out that I may be losing my family and my amazing band teacher, Mr. Trivette, all because of the unnecessary proposed redistricting lines. My heart ached because I would have to go to South. Nothing is wrong with South; I would just prefer to be with my family.
I know that I am not the only one to say that we don’t need the redistricting. I know that it would increase the dropout rate, lower the sport participation and possibly make teachers lose their jobs. The whole redistricting idea is nothing but trouble! So come to the board meeting on Nov. 2 and 9 to support your school.
ó Lindsey Shoaf
Salisbury
Attend meetings, voice your opinionI have to agree with Angela Shoaf’s earlier letter. Whether you are affected by redistricting or not, you need to come out and support your community and school.
Please voice your opinion to the school board on Nov. 2 at Knox Middle at 6 p.m. and on Nov. 9 at Southeast Middle School at 6 p.m. It will affect many students, and yes, it could hurt teachers’ jobs.
I would like to see that the two meetings that are going to be held at the schools to be filled up like the football games ó packed! I also agree we need change in the next election.
ó Melissa Washam-Ratliff
PTA president, West Rowan Middle School
Treaty is really about control, not climateDuring December the president is scheduled to sign the Copenhagen Treaty, which will further strangle our present economic condition by limiting carbon emissions. It will also continue to erode our national sovereignty by allowing an international organization to control our nation’s energy policy. The courts have ruled that treaties can override the U.S. Constitution.
Before you decide to support the treaty, please go to www.mnfmi.org and watch the presentation presented by the Minnesota Free Market Institute. Lord Christopher Monckton presents solid evidence of the skewed data, omitted data, and falsified data that have been used by Al Gore and the UN’s IPCC bureaucrats to convince intelligent people that we are the major cause of global warming. For example, the 1990 IPCC report included the Medieval Warm Period, which was warmer than it is now. However, the 2001 version left out this period of time in order to make it appear that the present warm trend is due to burning fossil fuels.
Monckton was asked by some members of the Senate to testify on the issue along with Al Gore, but the majority party refused to allow his testimony. Why? He would have shown the truth.
During a court case in the UK, the judge ruled that school children could not watch Al Gore’s movie “An Inconvenient Truth” before being told about the parts of the movie that are blatantly false. How many children in our nation have been exposed to this work of fiction without the disclaimer?
If you view the lecture in Minnesota and are convinced that Al Gore is not a brilliant climatologist, then please contact Senators Burr and Hagan and urge them to oppose the Copenhagen Treaty. It is about control not climate. We only have a few weeks left before it is due to be signed.
ó Joe D. Teeter
Gold Hill
Another boondoggle in the making
What could possible go wrong? Obama’s health care plan will be written by a committee whose only concern is how to make this plan appear affordable. To be passed by a Congress that hasn’t read it or doesn’t understand it, and will be exempt from it since they have their own medical insurance plan.
This will be signed by a president who is still a smoker and whose real concern about health care centers on legislation that will satisfy his idea of a great legacy of accomplishment, but it will prove to be just another boondoggle like the money spent on bailouts. It will be funded by a Treasury secretary who did not pay his taxes, overseen by a surgeon general who is obese and finally financed by a country that is broke.
What could possibly go wrong?
ó Richard Roberts
Kannapolis
Election issues for SpencerElection time is here, and everyone seems interested in the library in Spencer. For the past five years, all who were interested were a few citizens. Everyone has talked a good line, but only a few were interested enough to make improvements. One alderman told me that Spencer did not need a library because Salisbury has a great library, and if people in Spencer needed to use the library, they could go to Salisbury. Another alderman said the library could be moved to the town hall. I and many others who have been interested in library improvements have given it up as a lost cause. As the saying goes, you can’t fight city hall.
One mayoral candidate is using as his platform a return to curbside garbage pickup. Living in Spencer all but two years, I don’t remember Spencer having curbside garbage collection. Some people do put their garbage containers on the curb and some even put the containers in the street for pickup and, on occasion, the containers remain in the street several days. Will this become a habit all over town, to leave large green containers in front yards? I did ask about the change in garbage pickup and was told it would save money. Why not find other places to cut the budget? This system is working and is always on schedule.
How will we ever get businesses to come to Spencer when they see the Park Plaza buildings that are empty and have been for a period of time? This is one of the biggest eyesores in town.
Citizens of Spencer, talk to the candidates and let them tell you how they’ll improve things, and then you tell them what you want to see changed.
Mark your calendar and cast your vote on election day.
ó Pat Brandt
Spencer
Campaign lettersLetters commenting on candidates in the Nov. 3 election must be received in the Salisbury Post newsroom by 5 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 29.

Comments

Comments closed.

Local

City fights invasive beetles by injecting trees with insecticide

Local

City names downtown recipients for federal Parks Service grant

China Grove

China Grove Town Council weighs 2021-22 budget priorities, supports buying body cameras

Education

Educators reflect on Teacher Appreciation Week

Education

Livingstone College wins $30,000 Home Depot grant

Education

Shoutouts

News

Shield-A-Badge With Prayer program enters 26th year, accepting volunteers to pair with officers

Education

COVID-19 infection, quarantine numbers in Rowan-Salisbury Schools reach new highs

High School

High school football: Offensive line came together for Hornets, who play for state title tonight

Local

Pro baseball: White makes pro debut and says, ‘It felt amazing to be out there’

Education

West Rowan Middle eighth grader wins investment writing contest

Local

YSUP Rowan invites agencies to participate in youth-focused training

Nation/World

US backs waiving intellectual property rules on vaccines

News

As demand drops, Cooper visits vaccine clinic to urge usage

News

NC lawmakers advance bill barring mandatory COVID-19 shots

News

N.C. bill banning Down syndrome abortions nears floor vote

Coronavirus

Rowan County sees 301st death from COVID-19

Coronavirus

N.C. lawmakers advance bill barring mandatory COVID-19 shots

Local

Rowan Public Library joins initiative to help people with digital connectivity

Local

Mocksville to dissolve police department

Crime

Blotter: May 5

Local

Salisbury’s McElroy named top city, county communications professional in state

Local

Locals condemn use of force during 2019 traffic stop of Georgia woman

Kannapolis

Back and better than ever: Cannon Ballers kick off inaugural season in Atrium Health Ballpark