• 36°

Letters to the editor – Monday (9-21-09)

American currency: race and racism
Today we have become victims of political correctness and its appendage, racism.
I openly admit that I did not vote for Obama because of a belief he had not been seasoned and trained for the position of president. However, he is president and due the respect that goes with his present office. Representative Wilson’s comments were out of order and N.Y. Times columnist Maureen Dowd’s allegations of racism appear unwarranted. Her assumption that one disagreeing with the president is a racist is unfortunately within the realm of common currency in a nation that prides itself on the First Amendment. Those opposing his policies are automatically called racist, since many detractors have a coherent argument with which to challenge his governmental policy. By alleging racism, this alters the playing field. Now, the challenger can approach the problem on a different plane: make the Obama critic prove he is not a racist, thereby avoiding the real issue. This tactic, often used, portrays the intellectual bankruptcy of its user.
If we wish to fight racism today, oppose government policies that fester it, continue and encourage it and develop a change of mental attitude. Require Americans not to play victim, to be responsible and work without condemning the system for not giving them something without having earned it. Isn’t it time for black and white racists to grow up and work together to fix a system destroyed by the previous administrations? If you fear being rejected by your “friends” over your beliefs, are these people really friends?
We should have the dignity of giving Obama a chance and hope he was not involved with ACORN etc. We must legitimately criticize his conduct, and that of other politicians, national and local, but give him a chance devoid of any acknowledged stupidity.
ó Arthur Steinburg
Salisbury
Where are saner voices of leadership?This summer we learned that conservative Republicans, the self-proclaimed keepers of Patriotic values, have shown themselves to be dividers!
They say it’s patriotic to have as their primary agenda the failure of this president, even if the public stands to become the big losers in the process, and further to be ANTI anything proposed by Democrats. They say that incoherently opposing any health-care reform is patriotic. What they don’t say is how much financial reward they and the health-care industry stand to lose if reform occurs.
Do responsible Republicans really believe it is patriotic to allow division to occur by not challenging treasonable speech which implies or openly states that our duly elected government is illegitimate and should be overturned? Do responsible Republicans really want to ignore divisive inflammatory speech that potentially incites citizens to riot? .
Where are the saner voices ó Independents, Republicans and Democrats ó who were elected to represent all of us? Many Republican legislators appear to be spineless, often racially motivated, shortsighted and only interested in their re-election and financial gain. There used to be Republican congressional leadership who showed courage to act in the public interest and outrage at rude, public outbreaks directed toward our president. Where is the Maverick McCain in this discourse? He represented himself as a moderate, willing to stand up against his party when wrong? His silence is deafening.
Have we forgotten the principle “United We Stand, Divided We Fall”? Our enemies are now attacking from within! Are “We the People” brave enough to put those who are throwing divisive tantrums into “timeout” until they are willing to act like rational human beings, ready to ignore their own self-interest and prejudices and to begin to find common ground, to compromise and actually solve our national problems? What a revolutionary concept!
ó Marion McLaughlin
Salisbury
Burr, Coble have federal health careIt is hard to believe the FEHBP (Federal Employees Health Benefits Program) that all senators and congressmen have, and which I have, is not good enough for everyone else, according to Sen. Richard Burr (R) and Rep. Howard Coble (R).
They are going to vote NO for President Obama’s Health Care Reform Plan, which would make it available to all.
ó Peggy K. Reich
Salisbury
Christmas lights: bah, humbug!
While its true we need jobs in Rowan County and its true something needs to be done with Summit Park, aka Big Joke Park, has anyone considered the negative effects this light show would have.?
I’ve been to all the area shows and because of the long lines and lack of convenient bathroom facilities, I don’t recall spending one extra penny at local places of business. when all was said and done, I was glad to escape the traffic and head home.
This would be a nightmare on Julian, East Ritchie,and Concord Roads for traffic jams, lines backed up for hours, the litter left behind, not to mention the nursing home on Julian Road has need to get ambulances in and out all day and night and the Rescue Squad would be gridlocked in traffic. Instead of throwing more money into this folly, do the sensible thing and put this property on the market to sell to private developers, who just happen to know how to make money.
Rowan County needs to concentrate on the normal affairs of government and stay out of the private business sector. Everyone in Rowan County could decorate their yards and become Christmas County, USA, and this would do a better job of bringing in the flatlanders to spend their money here.
P.S. How bout a mall like Concord Mills, a real money maker… ?
ó Kirby Ritchie
Salisbury
Expo brings on a senior moment
With all the uproar about Tina Hall, here is the way a friend of mine in South Rowan County summed it up.
He said, “Tina probably asked all the right question, but for all the wrong reasons!”
So here is something easy the Rowan County board can work on next. It is not about politics or what your sexual preference may be. It is about simple arithmetic.
Tuesday, Sept. 15, I went to the Salisbury Mall for the Senior Expo.
The first table I visited was the Rowan Co. Senior Service. I asked the lady working the table how old did you have to be to be a senior in Rowan Co.
She said “Sixty years old!”
My next stop was at the Rufty-Holmes Senior Center table. I asked that lady how old did you have to be to be a senior at the Senior Center.
She said, “You have to be 55 years old.”
Now if you go down to Dan Nicholas Park compound (Rowan County Parks and Recreation) the sign there states seniors must be 62 years or older.
If you have to be 16 to drive a car, 18 to fight in a war, 21 to buy beer and cig-a-butts, why can’t someone figure out how old a senior citizen has to be in Rowan County?
ó Whitey Harwood
Mocksville
Clean energy vital to nation’s futureWe cannot afford to have our economy remain dependent on outdated energy sources that will do nothing to sustain the economy, the climate or the security of our nation.
Congress is now considering clean-energy legislation that will have vast positive impacts for everyday Americans, particularly provisions that promote energy efficiency. The House took the first step by passing the American Clean Energy and Security Act, and now it is time for the Senate to take action.
Strong clean-energy legislation that supports energy efficiency is critical to lasting energy savings for consumers and providing the basis for sustained economic growth in the future. The provisions in the bill mean estimated total energy savings of $207 a year for North Carolinians and the creation of 10,900 jobs in North Carolina.
Senator Hagan should support clean energy legislation because for every dollar invested in energy efficiency, you get three dollars in economic benefits and delivering these investments will produce jobs in North Carolina.
Passing strong clean energy legislation makes sense, reducing the costs of achieving our climate goals by lowering overall energy demand, as well as lowering the costs of generating power ó saving everyday North Carolinians hundreds of dollars a year on their utility bills while cutting greenhouse gas emissions.
ó Kassidee Fisher
Raleigh
Fisher is a field associate with the non-profit group Environment North Carolina.

Comments

Comments closed.

News

Nesting no more: Eagles appear to have moved on from Duke’s Buck Station

Business

The Smoke Pit leaving downtown Salisbury for standalone building on Faith Road

Education

Shoutouts

High School

High school football: Hornets’ Gaither set the tone against West

Local

Salisbury to show off new fire station

Education

Livingstone College to host virtual Big Read events this month

Local

City makes some appointments to local boards, holds off on others to seek women, appointees of color

Education

Education briefs: RCCC instructor honored by Occupational Therapy Association

Local

Second quarter financial update shows promising outlook for city’s budget

Columnists

Genia Woods: Let’s talk about good news in Salisbury

Local

City attorney will gather more information for Salisbury nondiscrimination ordinance

Education

North Hills planning to hold May fundraiser in person

East Spencer

Developers aim to transform former Dunbar School site into multi-purpose community development

Education

Knox student organizing event to get community cycling

Education

Decision on Essie Mae charter appeal expected Thursday

Nation/World

House passes sweeping voting rights bill over GOP opposition

Nation/World

Police uncover ‘possible plot’ by militia to breach Capitol

Nation/World

States rapidly expanding vaccine access as supplies surge

News

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper receives COVID-19 vaccine

News

North Carolina health officials urge schools to reopen

Crime

In letter, PETA criticizes Salisbury Police for K-9 video

Coronavirus

Three deaths, 29 new COVID-19 positives reported

Crime

Blotter: Bullet holes found in woman’s Park Avenue apartment

Crime

Man faces assault charges for domestic incident